Adding WRH to a local hosts file. | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED



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Adding WRH to a local hosts file.

This is useful to do if the Domain Name Service is hacked or simply unavailable. IF YOU ARE NOT EXPERIENCED WITH SYSTEM-LEVEL CHANGES, PLEASE CONSULT AN EXPERT SO THAT YOU DO NOT DAMAGE YOUR OPERATING SYSTEM.

  • Windows
    • Set a restore point. Start->All Programs->Accesories->System Tools->System Restore
    • Locate the file "Hosts" on your computer:

      Windows 95/98/Me  c:\windows\hosts
      Windows NT C:\winnt\system32\driverstc\hosts
      Windows 2000/XP c:\windows\system32\driverstc\hosts
      Windows XP Home c:\windows\system32\driverstc\hosts
      Windows 7 and 8 c:\windows\system32\driverstc\hosts
      (On some OEM versions of Windows 7 and 8 the hosts file is in a different location, so you will need to use the search tool to find it.)
      (you may need administrator access for Windows NT/2000/XP/7)

      NOTE: Hosts is the name of the hosts file and not another directory name. It does not have an extension (extensions are the .exe, .txt, .doc, etc. endings to filenames) and so appears to be another directory in the example above.

      You may have a file called "Hosts.sam". This file is a sample Hosts file (the .sam stands for sample) and can be used by removing the .sam extension so the name is just "Hosts". This file should be edited with a plain text editor, such as Notepad, and not a word processor, such as Microsoft Word. If in doubt, consult a windows expert.
    • Add this line to the Hosts file:

      173.236.29.251 whatreallyhappened.com

    • Sometimes, even when you are logged on with administrative credentials, you may recieve the following error message:

      Access to C:\Windows\System32\driverstc\ hosts was denied. Cannot create the C:\Windows\System32\driverstc\hosts file. Make sure that the path and file name are correct.

      In this case, type Notepad in start search and righ-click on the Notepad result. Selecet Run as administrator. Open the Hosts file, make the necessary changes, and then click Save.

    • Save your changes.
    • Reboot your computer.
    • Your windows machine will now find whatreallyhappened.com even if the DNS has been blocked or stops working.

    • NOTE: Windows users should verify that they are showing extensions for all file types. This will help verify that the Hosts file is named correctly. To reset Windows to show all file extensions, double click on My Computer. Go to View Menu (Win95/98/ME) or Tools Menu (Win2000/XP), and select Folder Options. Click the View tab. In the Files and Folders section, DESELECT (uncheck) the item named "Hide file extensions for known file types". Click Apply, and then click OK.

  • Linux

    • Edit the hosts file on your system. The hosts file is usually found in

      /etc/hosts

    • Add this entry to the Hosts file:

      173.236.29.251 whatreallyhappened.com

    • Now make sure this file is used for host name lookups. This is done in two files. First is:

      /etc/host.conf

      This file should have at least the line shown below:

      order hosts,bind

      That has host lookups use the hosts file before doing a DNS query with bind.

    • The next file is:

      /etc/nsswitch.conf

      Recent tests indicate that this file is required in order for the pserver to use the entry in /etc/hosts. The nsswitch.conf file should have this line for the hosts configuration:

      hosts: files nisplus nis dns

      There will probably already be a similar line in your version of this file. Just make sure "files" comes before whatever other methods are listed.

    • Reboot your computer
  • Macintosh OS X

    • With Macintosh OS X, the procedure is similar to Linux above. The hosts file can be found in

      /etc/hosts

    • Reader suggestion for smartphone users

      for those on android devices, you could recommend tor for android, as I'm not sure you can bypass dns through a hosts type file on phones without intimate knowledge and proper pc software. tor, however, will allow one to randomize their IP to get around regional blocks, assuming you're not familiar with the app or it's pc counterpart. Just a suggestion.

 

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