THE FEDERAL RESERVE HAS ITS OWN POLICE AND IS PART OF A VAST SURVEILLANCE CENTER – SHOULD YOU WORRY? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

THE FEDERAL RESERVE HAS ITS OWN POLICE AND IS PART OF A VAST SURVEILLANCE CENTER – SHOULD YOU WORRY?

Without any Congressional hearings on the matter, the USA Patriot Act in 2001 bestowed on the 12 regional Federal Reserve banks domestic policing powers. While the Federal Reserve Board of Governors in Washington, D.C. is deemed an “independent federal agency,” with its Chair and Governors appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate, the 12 regional Fed banks are private corporations owned by the member banks in their region. As settled law under John L. Lewis v. United States confirms: “Each Federal Reserve Bank is a separate corporation owned by commercial banks in its region.”

In the case of the New York Fed, which is located in the Wall Street area of Manhattan, its largest shareowners are behemoth multinational banks, including JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. So what the USA Patriot Act effectively did was to give multinational corporations domestic policing powers in New York City via the New York Fed.

Section 364 of the USA Patriot Act reads as follows:

“Law enforcement officers designated or authorized by the Board or a reserve bank under paragraph (1) or (2) are authorized while on duty to carry firearms and make arrests without warrants for any offense against the United States committed in their presence…Such officers shall have access to law enforcement information that may be necessary for the protection of the property or personnel of the Board or a reserve bank.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What the Patriot Act did, in essence, was to concentrate more wealth, intel, and policing into the hands of the already monied, and gives them the power to protect their wealth, at the cost of investors who have become "unsecured creditors."

The following article, from investopedia.com, explains this very clearly:

Why Bank Bail-Ins Will Be the New Bailouts

The article goes on to state: "With a bank bail-in, the bank uses the money of its unsecured creditors, including depositors and bondholders, to restructure their capital so it can stay afloat. In effect, the bank is allowed to convert its debt into equity for the purpose of increasing its capital requirements. A bank can undergo a bail-in quickly through a resolution proceeding, which provides immediate relief to the bank. The obvious risk to bank depositors is the possibility of losing a portion of their deposits. However, depositors have the protection of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), insuring each bank account for up to $250,000. Banks are required to use only those deposits in excess of the $250,000 protection.

As unsecured creditors, depositors and bondholders are subordinated to derivative claims. Derivatives are the investments that banks make among each other, which are supposed to be used to hedge their portfolios. However, the 25 largest banks hold more than $247 trillion in derivatives, which poses a tremendous amount of risk to the financial system."

This... is why you only have as much money in the bank as you need to pay your bills, period, end of discussion.

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