Good will to all men? Shop worker disperses homeless with freezing water, witness says | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Good will to all men? Shop worker disperses homeless with freezing water, witness says

A shop worker has allegedly hosed homeless people seeking shelter outside a shop front with ice cold water to prevent them sleeping there. Police investigated the incident after a local woman reported the alleged assault on social media.

Tammi-Lee Connor, who lives in Canterbury, says she saw a shop worker at the local Wilkinsons using a hosepipe in an attempt to remove a group of homeless people. The force of the hose reportedly caused one man to fall over and hit his head.

Connor says she confronted the shop worker, who apparently told her: “How else am I expected to move them?” She then phoned the police who arrived at the scene, but didn’t arrest the man.

Wilkinsons deny the worker was ousting the homeless, maintaining they were simply cleaning the shop front.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

If true, absoflippinglutely unbelievable!

Where the hell was this man's humanity, to use a hose as "homeless crowd control"?!?

And that Wilkinson corporation defends his actions, attempting to create an alternative narrative when the video was already up?!?!? What were they thinking?!? And to that corporation, when the does "cleaning the shop front" translate into the use of what amounted to a firehose being leveled at homeless people?!?

In the immortal words of my late Grandma Thelma, "the horse was already out of the barn!"

And to some of the local politicos in in Canterbury, with some reasoning ability, please take a look at what some of your brother and sister contemporaries in the state of Utah have been doing. As reported in stateofchange.org:

Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail stays for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but they keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s. It sounds like Utah borrowed a page from Homes Not Handcuffs, the 2009 report by The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and The National Coalition for the Homeless. Using a 2004 survey and anecdotal evidence from activists, the report concluded that permanent housing for the homeless is cheaper than criminalization. Housing is not only more human, it’s economical.

I commend the state of Utah for having had the collective intelligence to resolve its homelessness problem in such a humane way.

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