COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY

Oct 09 09:22

Smart Meters Create A “Honeypot” Of Personal Information To Exploit

By Catherine J. Frompovich

Over a year ago, reporter Ruth Lyle of the UK’s Daily Mail, published a rather introspective article about how AMI Smart Meters will be used to spy on British households and the ramifications of that totalitarian-like practice.

In reading Lyle’s article, I could not help but wonder if U.S. consumers are aware of what’s going on with AMI Smart Meters in the USA, because surveillance is part and parcel of the ‘new energy saving’ crisis...

Oct 09 08:15

It’s Not ‘Evil’ If We Do It: Google Accused in Trade-Secret Theft Lawsuit

The shocking new charges were filed against Google in Santa Clara, California — the heart of Silicon Valley — by architect Eli Attia who was invited in 2010 to commercially develop a software application with the powerful internet company that was based on Attia's proprietary intellectual property.

Oct 08 08:02

Facebook Blocks Chinese Billionaire Who Tells Tales of Corruption

A Chinese billionaire living in virtual exile in New York, Guo Wengui has riled China’s leaders with his sometimes outlandish tales of deep corruption among family members of top Communist Party officials.

On Saturday, his tales proved too much for one of his favorite platforms for broadcasting those accusations: Facebook.

The social media network said it had blocked a profile under Mr. Guo’s name and taken down another page associated with him. Facebook said the content on both pages had included someone else’s personal identifiable information, which violates its terms of service.

Facebook investigated the accounts after receiving a complaint, according to a spokeswoman.

Oct 08 07:00

Imran Awan ‘Very Strongly’ Wants To Block Review Of Hard Drive, Was Using Alias

The investigation into Imran and his family began when House authorities noticed they were billing expensive equipment to congressional offices and falsely listing the price as exactly $499.99, one penny under the threshold at which equipment is automatically tracked by House administrators. The Awans’ relatives told The Daily Caller News Foundation that similar equipment was being sent to Pakistan. The investigation soon broadened into cybersecurity issues, when authorities found the Awans had accessed a congressional server 5,400 times without authorization and moved “massive” data off the House network, The Washington Post reported in September.

After they learned of the investigation, prosecutors say the husband and wife tried to go to Pakistan, first wiring hundreds of thousands of dollars there that prosecutors allege was obtained through bank fraud. Authorities have not charged the Awans, as of yet, with crimes related to the original investigation in the House.

Oct 07 10:04

US Intelligence Unit Accused Of Illegally Spying On Americans’ Financial Records

The intelligence division at the Treasury Department has repeatedly and systematically violated domestic surveillance laws by snooping on the private financial records of US citizens and companies, according to government sources.

Over the past year, at least a dozen employees in another branch of the Treasury Department, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, have warned officials and Congress that US citizens’ and residents’ banking and financial data has been illegally searched and stored. And the breach, some sources said, extended to other intelligence agencies, such as the National Security Agency, whose officers used the Treasury’s intelligence division as an illegal back door to gain access to American citizens’ financial records. The NSA said that any allegations that it “is operating outside of its authorities and knowingly violating U.S. persons’ privacy and civil liberties is categorically false.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Conducting illegal searches is standard operating procedure for all Federal agencies; then, they lie about it, attempting to cover it up.

Oct 07 09:11

Kaspersky Lab Denies WSJ Allegations of Hacking NSA

Consistently at or near the top of security software maker rankings, Russian-based Kaspersky Lab continues to attract suspicion, based on little to no evidence, of being a “threat” to US national security.

This week, the allegations came out of the Wall Street Journal, which claimed that an NSA contractor who ran Kaspersky antivirus on his computer was hacked, and immediately concluded that Kaspersky hacked him to get NSA data for the Russian government.

Kaspersky founder Eugene Kaspersky mocked the claim as “like the script of a C movie.” He offered an alternate explanation for the data loss, that the NSA tools on the computer were correctly identified as new forms of malware by Kaspersky’s software.

The supposition that being a security software company and Russia-based makes them tantamount to Russian spies has been enough of an excuse for US officials to increasingly demonize the company, despite the lack of real evidence of wrongdoing, let alone culpability.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What the Wall Street Jerks' article provided was absolutely no tangible proof of their allegations whatsoever, and there was utterly no sourcing to these allegations.

Mike and I have used Kaspersky security products, and consider them excellent; but of course, we're not the ones desperately trying to demonize Russia toward the goal of starting a shooting war against it!!

Oct 07 07:35

Apple gave Uber ‘iPhone backdoor’ allowing covert screens & data access

Apple granted Uber’s iPhone app special privileges by giving the car-hailing service a potential ability to record their customers’ phone screens and access other personal data without their knowledge, cyber security experts say.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What other apps has Apple given this "entitlement" to?

Oct 07 05:16

Kaspersky Lab Denies WSJ Allegations of Hacking NSA

Consistently at or near the top of security software maker rankings, Russian-based Kaspersky Lab continues to attract suspicion, based on little to no evidence, of being a “threat” to US national security.

This week, the allegations came out of the Wall Street Journal, which claimed that an NSA contractor who ran Kaspersky antivirus on his computer was hacked, and immediately concluded that Kaspersky hacked him to get NSA data for the Russian government.

Kaspersky founder Eugene Kaspersky mocked the claim as “like the script of a C movie.” He offered an alternate explanation for the data loss>>>

Oct 06 13:13

Holy Tasteless! New Batman Video Game Depicts Murdered Russian Diplomat’s Body

The newest video game from developer Telltale Games’ series “Batman: The Enemy Within” features a photo of the corpse of Russian Ambassador to Turkey Andrei Karlov, who was assassinated in December 2016.

Karlov, a veteran diplomat who at one point served as the director of the Russian Foreign Ministry's Department of Consular Affairs (which provides passport and visa services), was killed during a scheduled speech at an art exhibition celebrating Turkish-Russian friendship. He was shot in the back by Mevlüt Mert Alt?nta?, a Turkish police officer who yelled "Allahu Akbar" and "Do not forget Aleppo, do not forget Syria" before being gunned down himself by Turkish security forces.

Footage and photos of Altintas standing over Karlov's body, shouting and brandishing his pistol, widely circulated online. One picture, taken by Hasam Kilic, seems to have found its way into an unexpected place: a crime scene being investigated by Batman in a video game.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Military/intelligence assets work hand in hand with the video/computer game industry every day.

So I have to wonder if the founders of this company, Dan Connors, Kevin Bruner and Troy Molander, are, perhaps, covert CIA/US military assets, who understand that if you are going to demonize a country (Let's say, for the sake of explanation, Russia) to your population, particularly to the young people who will be ultimately drafted to fight that country, you start with the young men, who are the primary players of computer games, to demonize that country which is ultimately going to be the recipient of an American military attack.

This has been rather recently released, so I wonder about the timing of an actual war with Russia, vis a vis the release of this video game, and how the owners of Telltale bet on the release of this game to continue the demonization in which the corporate presstitutes are collaborating so cheerfully.

Oct 06 12:38

Russian Hackers Win Again: John Kelly's Personal Cell Allegedly "Compromised" For Months

Is John Kelly the latest victim of the now infamous, pesky, yet extremely elusive, 'Russian hackers' that cost Hillary Clinton the 2016 election and are slowly taking over the world? According to Politico, he just might be...

White House officials believe that chief of staff John Kelly’s personal cellphone was compromised, potentially as long ago as December, according to three U.S. government officials.

The discovery raises concerns that hackers or foreign governments may have had access to data on Kelly’s phone while he was secretary of Homeland Security and after he joined the West Wing.

Tech support staff discovered the suspected breach after Kelly turned his phone in to White House tech support this summer complaining that it wasn’t working or updating software properly.

Kelly told the staffers the phone hadn’t been working properly for months, according to the officials.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

OK, let's track the logic; Kelly's personal phone misbehaves for months, and he doesn't have the horse sense to get it checked when it originally stopped working the way it should have?!?

And it is THIS guy who has the ear of the President of the United States?!?

Be afraid, people; be very afraid!!

Oct 06 12:21

YouTube revises search results following outrage over Las Vegas shooting conspiracy videos

YouTube is modifying its search algorithms to prevent conspiracy theories and fake news videos from making it to the top of its search results, following outrage over the high visibility of videos spreading misinformation about the Las Vegas mass shooting, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

"Misinformation" -> Anything that questions the official story.

Oct 06 09:39

PUTIN STRIKES AGAIN: RUSSIAN HACKERS REPORTEDLY STOLE NSA DATA ON CYBER DEFENSE

Looks like Russian President Vladimir Putin is back at it.

The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that hackers working for the Russian government have stolen data describing how US intelligence agencies infiltrate foreign computer networks and how they defend against cyberattacks. The data was stolen after a National Security Agency contractor removed the highly classified material and put it on his home computer, according to WSJ’s anonymous sources.

News of the hack, which hasn’t been exposed previously, explains the federal government’s abrupt crackdown on Moscow-based security firms Kaspersky Labs. As WSJ explains, the contractor may have been targeted after hackers identified the files thanks to the contractor’s use of a popular antivirus software created by Kaspersky.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

No sourcing?!?

Since, please, did WSJ get so completely sloppy in their "alleged" reporting?!?

And what moronic National Security Agency contractor would have been so completely stupid as to put sensitive material like that on their home computer?!?

Is the major prerequisite necessary to working for the NSA complete, and abysmal technological stupidity?!?

OK, WSJ: either source, and do what is supposed to be your job, or shut the flip up; this is simply more anonymous demonization of Russia, which we all understand is part of the prelude to a shooting war against it.

And to your Editor in Chief, Gerard Baker, a word, please, sir; whatever compensation you are getting, overtly or covertly, from elements of the Deep State in this country, desperate to see this country at war with Russia (and China) to cut off the rise of the ruble and yuan in international trade, it cannot possibly be enough!!

Oct 06 06:26

Secret backdoor in Uber's app granted by Apple lets the firm record your iPhone's screen without you knowing

An 'unprecedented' level of access granted to Uber's iPhone app means the firm could be watching your every move.

Apple has given the company special powers that could be used to record a user's screen and access other sensitive data without their knowledge or permission.

Experts have warned that the feature, which is not listed in any of Uber's public information, may be available even when the app is closed.

Oct 06 06:16

DO NOT CLICK: Ads Falsely Reporting Deaths Of Bill O'Reilly And Rush Limbaugh Likely Malware

The files to which the ads are linked are highly suspicious, so much so that I didn't run them even quarantined.

Screenshots of the ads are here, as well as links to the online tests. You can look at the embedded code yourself there, safely; it was labeled "suspicious," which seems to me to be very possibly an understatement.

Be safe, and

Be seeing you.

Oct 06 06:11

HPE server firmware update permanently bricks network adapters

Here's a fantastic fail: HPE's July ServicePack for ProLiant servers bricked some network adapters so badly they “must be replaced.”

An advisory issued late last week explained that the mess is triggered “when a driver upgrade is performed with … HPE QLogic NX2 1/10/20 GbE Multifunction Drivers for VMware vSphere 5.5, 6.0, and 6.5”.

The relevant drivers glory in the names “net-bnx2x_2.713.30.v55.7-1OEM.550.0.0.1331820” and “net-bnx2x_2.713.30.v60.7-1OEM.600.0.0.2494585” and were supposed to update HPE's Flex-10 530-series network adapters and FlexFabric 630-series kit.

Oct 05 09:54

Two New Montana Laws Take on Warrantless Electronic Data Collection

By Michael Maharrey

On Sunday, two Montana laws went into effect that work together to ban warrantless collection of cell phone data in most situations. These laws not only increase privacy protections in the state, they also hinder one practical impact of federal surveillance programs.

Rep. Daniel Zolnikov sponsored both House Bill 147 (HB147) and House Bill 148 (HB148). Working together, these two bills require government agencies to get a warrant before obtaining data from electronic devices such as smart phones, computers and tablets in most situations...

Oct 05 09:21

Snap, crackle ... patch! Apple kicks out iOS 11.0.2 to tackle crappy calls, fix email glitches

The iOS 11.0.2 release consists of a trio of fixes that were reported by fans shortly after the arrival of version 11.0 of the operating system and iPhone 8 and 8 Plus last month.

Most notably, the firmware update removes the "crackling" sound iPhone 8 and 8 Plus owners had been suffering on voice calls. Apple claimed the now-resolved noise problem only affected a "small number" of its latest handsets.

Also patched was an iOS 11 issue that would cause some photos to be erroneously marked as hidden, and separated from the main photo album, and a bug that had prevented users from opening some attachments in S/MIME encrypted email messages. This week's 11.0.2 update also includes the 11.0.1 bug fix that corrects connectivity issues between iThings and Microsoft-powered email systems, which were present in the 11.0 launch release.

Oct 05 07:30

IRS Awards Multi-Million Dollar Fraud-Prevention Contract To Equifax Who Was Hacked TWICE

By Aaron Kesel

You can’t make this up. The IRS awarded Equifax with a multi-million dollar fraud prevention no-bid contract despite that its own execs committed market fraud when they sold shares before telling the public they were hacked.

The IRS will pay Equifax $7.25 million to help verify taxpayer identities and prevent fraud under a no-bid contract issued last week...

Oct 04 09:57

The Largest Hack Ever? Yahoo Admits 2013 Data Breach Impacted All 3 Billion Accounts

Is it too late for Verizon to get some more of its money back?

After the entity responsible for selling Yahoo agreed to cut $350 million off the company’s sales price earlier this year following revelations that hackers had stolen sensitive account information of as many as 1.5 billion user accounts during two separate data breaches, the Wall Street Journal is now reporting that the scale of one of those intrusions was much larger than initially believed.

A 2013 data breach that was initially believed to have impacted 1 billion, actually impacted all of Yahoo's 3 billion user accounts, Verizon announced on Tuesday. Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo formally closed in June after contentious negotiations that were complicated by the discovery of the hacks. The smaller of the two incidents, which took place in 2014, was first disclosed to the public last September. It reportedly involved 500 million user accounts. Three months later, in December, the company publicized the 2013 hack.

Oct 04 09:07

Watching terrorist propaganda online to become a criminal offence, says Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd

Ms Rudd said: “I want to make sure those who view despicable terrorist content online including jihadi websites, far-right propaganda and bomb-making instructions face the full force of the law.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

"Far-right propaganda?!?" Does she mean ME?!?

Oct 04 09:00

Exposing 'In-Q --Tel': The CIA's Own Venture Capital Firm

VIDEO

Google, Facebook, the IT Sector and the CIA

In-Q-Tel was formed by the CIA in 1999 as a private, not-for-profit venture capital firm

Oct 04 08:48

Yahoo hack: Company leaked details of everyone who uses it!

Yahoo leaked the details of all the people who used it, it has said.

Some three billion accounts were compromised – the equivalent of half the people on Earth – in a 2013 hack. That accounts for everyone who used it at the time of the leak.

Yahoo had previously said that around one billion accounts were part of that hack when it disclosed it at the end of this year, already a unprecedentedly large leak of information. But it has now revised that total.

Oct 04 07:46

North Korea now has a second internet link through Russia

North Korea had previously gotten its internet through a hardwire to China, but that's no longer the case: Now, it has a second link to the world wide web through Russia cybersecurity firm FireEye told Bloomberg. This confirms an initial report by site 38 North that claimed the secondary connection went active on Sunday.

This gives North Korea an alternative method of accessing the internet -- which, aside from the obvious benefit of redundant access, might mitigate the damage from foreign attempts to block their service. A report on Sunday revealed that US Cybercommand had been harassing the North Korean government's hacking group with denial-of-service attacks for six months. It's unclear if their method would be as effective now that the East Asian country has a second line to the outside internet.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Maybe I need a second line through Russia!

Oct 03 17:23

Yahoo just said every single account was affected by 2013 attack — 3 billion in all

In 2016, Yahoo disclosed that more than one billion of about three billion accounts had likely been affected by the hack. In its disclosure Tuesday, the company said all accounts were likely victimized.

Oct 03 17:14

Patch your WordPress plugins: Scum are right now hijacking blogs

Unless of course your site is so dull that a little hacker defacement will cheer it up

Oct 03 16:58

PA Attorney General Concerned About Equifax Cyberattack; Will U.S. Attorneys General Be Upset About Utility Smart Meters Hacking?

By Catherine J. Frompovich

According to news reports [1], Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro is concerned about and investigating the credit bureau Equifax’s data breach affecting some 143 to 145 million Americans...

Consumers don’t know Equifax was collecting their important credit information and selling it to others! However, that’s the very same tactic/problem/issue that is being programmed to be done by and with AMI Smart Meters being retrofitted on to electric, natural gas and water utilities services nationwide by states’ utility commissions...

Oct 03 10:53

FLASHBACK - Rivero challenges the NSA

The US Government insists their demand for a ban on strong encryption or back doors into all of our electronic devices is to stop crime and terror.

But over the course of a year, as documented on this page, What Really Happened issued six encryption challenges based on systems of encryption created and programmed here on an air-gapped computer.

Now, I am not an encryption expert, and only a moderately decent programmer. The NSA would have a strong motive to break my codes to discourage others from creating their own systems of encryption.

None were ever solved.

If I can beat the NSA, it means real criminals and terrorists can defeat the NSA and keep their communications private.

Hence, the real agenda of the government is not to stop crime and terror but to monitor the American people to make sure they are not thinking those double-plus ungood thoughts about how this nation is being run!

Oct 03 08:53

Microsoft may have its groove back but it's binned 'Groove'

Ghost-of-Zune music subscription service retired, users shunted to Spotify

Oct 03 08:51

Commodore 64 makes a half-sized comeback

The Commodore 64 is coming back, in a form that owes a debt to both Nintendo's shrunken Mini SNES and thee Vega+ Sinclair ZX Spectrum reboot.

The due-in-early 2018 “C64 Mini” matches Nintendo's plan to shrink an old machine, in this case by 50 per cent. Like the Mini and the Vega+ the revived Commodore will pack in pre-loaded retro games, 64 of them to be precise. The device will also ship with a USB joystick boasting 80s styling, HDMI out so it can connect to modern tellies and USB-mini for power.

Oct 03 08:47

Google Finds 7 Security Flaws in Widely Used Dnsmasq Network Software

Security researchers have discovered not one or two, but a total of seven security vulnerabilities in the popular open source Dnsmasq network services software, three of which could allow remote code execution on a vulnerable system and hijack it.

Dnsmasq is a widely used lightweight network application tool designed to provide DNS (Domain Name System) forwarder, DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) server, router ads and network boot services for small networks.

Dnsmasq comes pre-installed on various devices and operating systems, including Linux distributions such as Ubuntu and Debian, home routers, smartphones and Internet of Things (IoT) devices. A shodan scan for "Dnsmasq" reveals around 1.1 million instances worldwide.

Oct 03 08:45

Whoops, Turns Out 2.5 Million More Americans Were Affected By Equifax Breach

Credit rating agency Equifax says an additional 2.5 million U.S. consumers were also impacted by the massive data breach the company disclosed last month, bringing the total possible victims to 145.5 million from 143 million.

Oct 03 08:24

Mastermind Of $4 Billion Bitcoin Money Laundering Operation May Be Extradited To US

After being arrested over the summer in a sting that was orchestrated by US and European law-enforcement agencies, Russian-born Alexander Vinnick, the purported creator and operator of shadowy digital-currency exchange BTC-E, appeared in a Greek court late last week for the first of what could be several hearings to determine where he will ultimately stand trial, CoinDesk reported.

As we reported at the time of Vinnick’s arrest, the 38-year-old Russian man was wanted in the US on suspicion of masterminding a money laundering operation involving at least $4 billion in bitcoin transactions.

Oct 03 07:14

Google Admits Citing 4chan To Spread Fake Vegas Shooter News

Google News took the unusual step of confirming its use of the imageboard site 4chan as a news source on Monday. The admission followed Google News' propagation of an incorrect name as a potential shooter in the tragic Las Vegas shooting on Sunday night.

Oct 02 13:41

New Ghost Gun Update Allows 3D Printing of Untraceable Handgun

By Derrick Broze

The controversial organization Defense Distributed just made it easier to 3D print untraceable handguns.

On October 1, Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed began selling two of the most common handgun “80 percent” receivers. In addition to selling a $1,200 computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) mill which can complete unfinished lower receivers for AR-15 semi-auto rifles, Defense Distributed will now sell unfinished receivers for Glocks and single-stack M1911s.

Using Defense Distributed’s mill, known as the Ghost Gunner, anyone with $1,200 and some basic milling knowledge can create the lower receiver of an AR-15 rifle...

Oct 02 08:41

iPhone X: Sorry Apple, but I just can't face using Face ID

Apple promises that using facial recognition will be more secure than using a fingerprint.

"The probability that a random person in the population could look at your iPhone X and unlock it using Face ID is approximately 1 in 1,000,000 (versus 1 in 50,000 for Touch ID)," said Apple's security paper.

The use of the technology has worried some, but a few of the security concerns are perhaps a bit overblown: in the case of the iPhone X authentication system, there's no single database for hackers to steal because the biometric data is stored in encrypted form on the phone.

However, there are still a few things that make me reluctant to use it.

First, for a smartphone I'd argue that a fingerprint is actually the easiest replacement for the password: it's less controversial than using your face and probably even faster.

Oct 01 09:30

Amazon's Whole Foods Market Suffers Credit Card Breach In Some Stores

Another day, another data breach. This time Amazon-owned grocery chain has fallen victim to a credit card security breach.

Whole Foods Market—acquired by Amazon for $13.7 billion in late August—disclosed Thursday that hackers were able to gain unauthorized access to credit card information for its customers who made purchases at certain venues like taprooms and full table-service restaurants located within some stores.

Whole Foods Market has around 500 stores in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada.

The company did not disclose details about the targeted locations or the total number of customers affected by the breach, but it did mention that hackers targeted some of its point-of-sale (POS) terminals in an attempt to steal customer data, including credit details.

The company also said people who only shopped for groceries at Whole Foods were not affected, neither the hackers were able to access Amazon transactions in the security breach.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

You can't hack cash. And until the government is able to deal with cyber-crime, it has no business pushing the cashless society agenda!

Sep 30 10:20

ARE YOU BEING WATCHED? FINFISHER GOVERNMENT SPY TOOL FOUND HIDING AS WHATSAPP AND SKYPE

Legitimate downloads of popular software including WhatsApp, Skype and VLC Player are allegedly being hacked at an internet service provider (ISP) level to spread an advanced form of surveillance software known as "FinFisher", cybersecurity researchers warn.

FinFisher is sold to global governments and intelligence agencies and can be used to snoop on webcam feeds, keystrokes, microphones and web browsing. Documents, previously published by WikiLeaks, indicate that one tool called "FinFly ISP" may be linked to the case.

The digital surveillance tools are peddled by an international firm called Gamma Group and have in the past been sold to repressive regimes including Bahrain, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Sep 30 09:35

This Dumb Smart Fridge Shows Why the Internet of Things Will Break

If you think a smart fridge is a dumb idea, you’re not alone. When people started buzzing about the Internet of Things (4.9 billion connected devices and counting), lots of experts sent up warning flares. “If you think error messages and applications crashes are a problem now, just wait until the web is embedded in everything from your car to your sneakers,” Wired reporter Klint Finley cautioned in 2014.

We’ve worried in the past about how embedded electronics open up your teddy bears and cars to copyright restrictions, as well as about how they can shorten the lifespan of devices. For refrigerators, a shorter lifespan is a particularly big deal—appliances actually make up about 60% of global e-waste.

Refrigerators usually last about 14 years, a lifespan that has held pretty constant in the last few decades. But smart fridges threaten to shorten that lifespan significantly. In the software world, 14 years is practically an eternity.

Sep 30 09:30

New Montana Law Limits ALPR Use, Helps Block National License Plate Tracking Program

By Michael Maharrey

Tomorrow, a Montana law that limits the use of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs) in the state goes into effect. The new law will also place significant roadblocks in the way of a federal program using states to help track the location of millions of everyday people through pictures of their license plates.

Rep. Daniel Zolnikov (R-Billings) sponsored House Bill 149 (HB149). The legislation prohibits the use of ALPRs except for specified purposes, and also places limitations on the retention and sharing of data gathered by license plate readers.

The Montana Senate passed HB149 by a 48-1 vote. The House concurred with a 91-7 vote, With Gov. Steve Bullock’s signature the law goes into effect Oct. 1...

Sep 30 09:29

The Coming Software Apocalypse

“Computing is fundamentally invisible,” Gerard Berry said in his talk. “When your tires are flat, you look at your tires, they are flat. When your software is broken, you look at your software, you see nothing.”

“So that’s a big problem.”

Sep 29 17:53

Info on CCleaner Infections Lost Due To Malware Server Running Out of Disk Space

Avast's Threat Intelligence Team published new details today about the CCleaner malware incident that came to light on Monday.

According to Avast, the database where the CCleaner hackers were collecting data from infected hosts ran out of space and was deleted on September 12, meaning information on previous victims is now lost to investigators and the number of computers infected with the second-stage backdoor payloads may be larger than initially believed.

This means there could still be — and there certainly are — more large technology firms that currently have a backdoor on their network.

Sep 29 15:38

Amazon's Echo Spot is a sneaky way to get a camera into your bedroom

Amazon unveiled six new hardware products at its surprise event in Seattle yesterday, but the Echo Spot has everyone talking. Most people think the Echo Spot is cute; a little alarm clock that’s designed to sit next to your bed. While all the focus is on what the Echo Spot looks like, it’s important to remember that Amazon is using the Spot as a very clever way of making you comfortable with having a camera in your bedroom. It’s also a camera that will probably be pointing directly at your bed.

Sep 29 12:54

Julian Assange Says He Will Provide Evidence Russia Narrative Is False in Exchange for Pardon

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has offered to provide evidence that the Russian collusion narrative is false in exchange for a pardon from President Trump.

The president, apparently, has not yet gotten the message. On Saturday, President Trump told reporters that he has "never heard" of Assange's offer to make a deal.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) told The Daily Caller that Trump is being blocked from knowing about the potential deal with Assange. “I think the president’s answer indicates that there is a wall around him that is being created by people who do not want to expose this fraud that there was collusion between our intelligence community and the leaders of the Democratic Party,” Rohrabacher said.

Sep 29 11:28

Gallery: 10 of the most dangerous malware threats on the internet today

You've probably heard of some, if not all, of the malware on this list. Most of it has been around for a while, staying alive through various incarnations thanks to the efforts of hackers. After all, why reinvent the wheel when you can just make tweak code that already works?

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Sep 29 08:51

Denuvo Crisis After Total Warhammer 2 Gets Pirated in Hours

Denuvo, the world's most feared gaming anti-piracy mechanism, was deployed yesterday on the brand new Total War: Warhammer 2. Instead of the months, weeks, or even days of protection usually offered by the system, the whole thing collapsed within hours.

Sep 29 08:32

Google warns that govt is demanding more of your private data than ever

And thousands more user accounts have been affected by US national security orders than previously reported.

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