COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY

Sep 13 15:51

A Contagious Bluetooth Flaw Makes ALL Your Connected Devices Hackable

Do you have a Bluetooth device running Windows, IoS, Android, or Linux?

If you do, a new flaw has been discovered that means it's vulnerable to a cyber-attack. A hacker can take control of everything on the device, including bank accounts and personal information. Here's what you need to do. And it's contagious, meaning it can spread to other connected devices.

Sep 13 11:27

New White House Comms Director "Suspended" From Twitter One Day After Appointment

Following a coordinated alt-left attack targeting Hope Hicks' account, Twitter has suspended the new White House Communications Director's account after a mass-reporting.

Sep 13 08:38

FORMER CITI CEO PANDIT SAYS AI WILL REPLACE 30 PERCENT OF BANKING JOBS WITHIN 5 YEARS

Banks have already started to roll out automated systems.

While Vikram Pandit’s prediction is bad news for back-office employees, banks have already begun to use AI and machine learning in a big way.

From stock picking quants such as those currently under development by iBankCoin (to be rolled out in Exodus), to “robo-advisors” which handle client portfolios deemed too small to justify a costly human broker, to high frequency trading (HFT) algos, to intelligent fraud detection systems which detect and adapt to fraudulent behavior – banks are becoming increasingly reliant on automated systems.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The short answer is, the recent law school grad with $150,000 in debt cannot compete.

College counselors need to be looking at future job trends for at least 20 years into the future, in terms of guiding students toward careers that will actually exist when they graduate, and that is just the hard truth.

Sep 13 08:21

Apple iPhone X: Everything the pros need to know

Mostly notably, the iPhone X includes a nearly bezel-less OLED display with 1125x2436 resolution (compared to a 1080x1920 LCD on 2016's iPhone 7 Plus). That enables the iPhone X to have a larger 5.8-inch screen (compared to the 5.5-inch iPhone 7 Plus) while having a smaller form factor that is actually closer in size to the iPhone 7 with its 4.7-inch screen.

But, the thin bezels also cause the iPhone X to lose its home button and its fingerprint scanner. As a result, Apple is replacing Touch ID with Face ID, which will create a 3D map of your face and use that to unlock the device. The challenge—judging by the face-scanning software of the past from Google and others—is that it may not be as fast and accurate as a fingerprint scanner.

There's also a natural security concern about Face ID being spoofed, but Apple says its new "True-Depth Camera System" takes a 3D mathematical model of your face and that it cannot be faked out by photos or even prosthetic masks.

Sep 13 07:54

BEX ALERT - North Korea’s hackers are reportedly targeting bitcoin exchanges

North Korea’s hackers have been linked with many attacks, including the 2014 Sony hack, but it looks like the totalitarian state is now targeting bitcoin, and crypto coin exchanges in particular, with its hacking teams.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The SONY "hack" turned out to be an internal leak which North Korea had nothing to do with. But any lie will suffice on the path to war!

Sep 13 07:26

iPhone X: How outrageous is that $999 price tag?

The iPhone X starts at $999 for 64 gigabytes of storage, with that price rising to $1,149 for those who want 256 gigabytes of storage. Is this price tag justifiable or is it outrageous?

Webmaster's Commentary: 

For that much money, the thing should be able to rotate my tires and take my weights up to the attic!

Sep 13 07:05

KILL THE PASSWORD: A STRING OF CHARACTERS WON’T PROTECT YOU

This summer, hackers destroyed my entire digital life in the span of an hour. My Apple, Twitter, and Gmail passwords were all robust—seven, 10, and 19 characters, respectively, all alphanumeric, some with symbols thrown in as well—but the three accounts were linked, so once the hackers had conned their way into one, they had them all. They really just wanted my Twitter handle: @mat. As a three-letter username, it’s considered prestigious. And to delay me from getting it back, they used my Apple account to wipe every one of my devices, my iPhone and iPad and MacBook, deleting all my messages and documents and every picture I’d ever taken of my 18-month-old daughter.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Sep 12 17:04

Social cooling: Does the fear of surveillance make you self-conscious about what you click on?

You're on social media, scrolling for something to capture your attention, and you pause.

There's an image or link that looks interesting. But if you were to click and others — your friends, your family, your employer — were to find out, would that be embarrassing?

While the internet and social media have made us more interconnected than ever, it's also meant constant surveillance by companies — in other words, the feeling that on the internet, we are always being watched. Our clicks are logged, categorised, interpreted and rated.

It's leading to what Tijmen Schep, a Dutch technology critic, calls "social cooling" — a society of increasing social conformity and rigidity, in which we self-censor or second guess what we do online for fear of repercussions.

Sep 12 16:56

How your home Wi-Fi security could end up in hot water

It no longer applies to any iKettles that London-based Smarter is producing or to its updated app, according to Michael Hutchison, a company spokesman.

The outdated kettle had a hard-coded password of "000000," a security flaw common to many IoT devices, Hart noted.

Once the first-generation kettle was hijacked, Hart was able to control it without any other permissions. He started boiling the water without permission. But obviously worse things can happen.

"The attacker could use the kettle itself to gain access to your home Wi-Fi," Hart said. "Someone could come along and extract your home Wi-Fi remotely, and then use it against your network."

Smarter sells into 27 countries, but the iKettle has never been available in the US.

Sep 12 16:47

Our entire credit bureau system is broken

It’s bad to have your Social Security number and birthday stolen because criminals can use that information to apply for credit in your name. Why make that data so useful in the first place? There’s nothing magical about a Social Security number. We only use them for credit reporting because every US citizen has one, and they’re all supposedly secret. But those numbers haven’t been truly secret for a long time. Before the Equifax breach, there was the Experian breach, the Anthem breach, and the OPM breach. For millions of people, authentication by Social Security number no longer works. So why are we still using a credit system that relies on breachable data?

The credit bureau system is broken, and it’s been broken for a long time.

Sep 12 16:43

PSA: no matter what, Equifax may tell you you’ve been impacted by the hack

So then I decided to test the system with a different last name and six random numbers. I used the more popular English spelling of my last name for this purpose, entering “Burr” instead of “Buhr” and entered six random numbers I don’t even remember now.

Sure enough, this made-up person had also been impacted. I tried it over and over again and got the same message. The only time I did not get the message I’d been impacted was when I entered “Elmo” as the last name and “123456” as my Social Security number.

...

What this means is not only are none of the last names tied to your Social Security number, but there’s no way to tell if you were really impacted.

It’s clear Equifax’s goal isn’t to protect the consumer or bring them vital information. It’s to get you to sign up for its revenue-generating product TrustID.

Sep 12 11:08

Chinese government sources tell the WSJ they're about to shut down all domestic Bitcoin exchanges

China's "economic miracle" has been accompanied by mass-scale looting, creating a class of super-rich, corrupt millionaires and billionaires to rival the US or Russia; these 1%ers know that their wealth is subject to the whims of the Politburo, which is why they are so anxious to acquire second passports, and to exfiltrate their cash through baroque schemes, anodyne scams, and runaway property speculation.

Sep 12 10:06

Why Nobody Can Trust Facebook

But time and again Facebook has undermined its credibility by making claims that are easily proven to be false, and then defended these claims with statements that are absurd.

This week it was reported that Facebook was claiming to reach 41 million Americans between the ages of 18-24. If Facebook reached every American between 18 and 24 they'd still be 10 million short. There are only 31 million of them.

Sep 12 09:53

Why hotel WiFi connections are a hacker's dream come true - explained

With your feet up at the end of a long day and with the tiny kettle boiling, it can be very tempting to log into your hotel's WiFi connection and have a scroll through social media. You may quickly log in to your online banking, download some podcasts or even send some work emails.

But have you ever stopped to consider the hotspot you are connected to – which is probably using the name of the hotel followed by the word 'Guest' – is actually a trap?

That your usernames, passwords and other sensitive information may be flowing directly into the hands of a hacker? You should, cybersecurity experts warn.

Sep 12 09:47

We’re all Equif*cked

It used to be that getting hacked or breached meant you had to change all your passwords. Attackers hit tech-first companies that at least had a basic understanding of security, and a limited amount of your immutable personal information. The Yahoo breaches from 2014 and 2015 that impacted over 1 billion users were huge, but not nearly as harmful as what happens now.

Today, the hacks and breaches are hitting banking and credit companies, government databases, voting machines, and public utility infrastructure. That stolen data can’t always be changed, like your date of birth. Unless the government decides to reissue everyone a new social security number, once it’s stolen, it’s permanently vulnerable to exploitation.

Sep 12 09:36

Trump Administration Urges Congress To Renew Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA)

By Aaron Kesel

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is urging Congress to “promptly” reauthorize section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) scheduled to expire at the end of this year...

Sep 12 09:23

Decision Makers Have Been Informed Of Evidence Against Russia Hack

Adam Carter has published a new article which states that important authorities including Robert Mueller and Jeff Sessions have been personally informed of the latest information debunking the Russian Hacking narrative. Pretended ignorance on the matter would be unacceptable.

Disobedient Media has previously reported on the extensive work conducted by the independent analyst known as Adam Carter. For months, Carter has been on the forefront of debunking the Russian hacking narrative by dismantling the Guccifer 2.0 persona and its contradictory claims. Carter’s work has been instrumental in creating the impetus and grounds for the analysis of the Forensicator, and in corroborating the efforts of Veteran Intelligence Professionals For Sanity (VIPS).

Sep 12 09:17

Private Company Surveilling People Online, Selling Info to Law Enforcement, Govt Agencies

A private company is turning a profit by surveilling people online and then selling valuable information to law enforcement and government agencies.

According to The Washington Post, the company, Babel Street, offers “a subscription called Babel X” which trawls through “some 40 online sources, scooping up data from popular sites such as Instagram and a Korean social media platform as well as inside ‘dark Web’ forums where cybercriminals lurk.”

The Pentagon was the subscription’s first customer, and some users pay more than $20,000 a year to use the service.

Sep 12 09:15

Maryland Judge Demands Bar Investigation Of Hillary Aides Who Helped Destroy Private Emails

Last week the FBI denied Ty Clevenger's FOIA request for Hillary Clinton's emails due a supposed "lack of public interest." No really...once you've manage to stop laughing, you can read our prior post on the topic here: FBI Denies FOIA Request For Hillary Documents Due To "Lack Of Public Interest".

Alas, Clevenger isn't the type to give up so easily and managed to find a judge in Maryland who seemingly agrees that the willful destruction of evidence subject to a Congressional subpoena might not be just a "frivolous" issue that suffers from an overwhelming "lack of public interest." As the Washington Times points out today, Maryland judge Paul Harris Jr. has ordered the Maryland state bar to investigate former Hillary aides David Kendall, Cheryl Mills and Heather Samuelson for their efforts in allegedly helping Hillary "destroy evidence."

Sep 12 09:11

Google Drive down in parts of US

Google Drive services are down in parts of the US. The outage has been confirmed by Google, which says it’s working on resolving the issues.

G Suite services stated at 17:48 GMT that they were investigating reports of an issue with Google Drive. At 18:04 it said the problem should have already been resolved.

Users across the US however are still reporting issues with the service on Downdetector.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This is why I like keeping my data here at home and not on someone else's server!

Sep 12 08:36

Security flaws put billions of Bluetooth phones, devices at risk

A set of vulnerabilities affecting "almost every" Bluetooth-connected desktop, mobile, and smart device on the market has been revealed.

Eight separate flaws, known collectively as "BlueBorne" by researchers at security firm Armis, affect devices with the Bluetooth short-range wireless protocol.

The more serious flaws allow an attacker to gain control of affected devices and their data, and steal sensitive business data from corporate networks. Malware exploiting the attack vector may be particularly virulent by passing peer-to-peer and jumping laterally, infecting adjacent devices when Bluetooth is switched on, said the researchers.

A single infected device moving through a busy office past dozens of people with phones, tablets, or computers with Bluetooth switched on could cause a rapid infection across networks -- leading to network infiltration, ransomware attacks, or data theft.

Sep 12 08:32

Chatbot lets you sue Equifax for up to $25,000 without a lawyer

If you’re one of the millions affected by the breach, a chatbot can now help you sue Equifax in small claims court, potentially letting you avoid hiring a lawyer for advice.

Even if you want to be part of the class action lawsuit against Equifax, you can still sue Equifax for negligence in small claims court using the DoNotPay bot and demand maximum damages. Maximum damages range between $2,500 in states like Rhode Island and Kentucky to $25,000 in Tennessee.

The bot, which launched in all 50 states in July, is mainly known for helping with parking tickets. But with this new update, its creator, Joshua Browder, who was one of the 143 million affected by the breach, is tackling a much bigger target, with larger aspirations to match. He says, “I hope that my product will replace lawyers, and, with enough success, bankrupt Equifax.”

Sep 12 08:26

Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

Innovation, fetishized by Silicon Valley companies and celebrated by business boosters, no longer provides the economic jolt it once did.

In order to maintain Moore's Law – by which transistor density doubles every two years or so – it now takes 18 times as many scientists as it did in the 1970s.

That means each researcher's output today is 18 times less effective in terms of generating economic value than it was several decades ago.

On an annual basis, research productivity is declining at a rate of about 6.8 per cent per year in the semiconductor industry. In other words, we're running out of ideas.

Sep 12 05:39

Cyber Experts Prove the American Power Grid Has Been Hacked

A report by internet security experts, Symantec, says that a hacking group called Dragonfly 2.0 has gained access to 20 power company networks. The American power grid has been hacked, but for some reason, the culprits restrained themselves from taking down the power like they did in Ukraine recently.

While we were all focused on the natural disasters like wildfires and hurricanes looming over us, this report went all but unnoticed by the mainstream and alternative media alike.

A power grid attack could shut down commerce and destroy our already precarious financial system. It could take down our medical system. If the damage was long-lasting, chaos would erupt and it wouldn't take long for the death toll to skyrocket, so dependent are we on power at the flip of a switch.

Sep 11 11:57

WELCOME TO 1984: BIG BROTHER GOOGLE NOW WATCHING YOUR EVERY POLITICAL MOVE

Google has taken the unprecedented step of burying material, mostly from websites on the political right, that it has deemed to be inappropriate. The problem, however, is that the world's largest search engine is a left-leaning company with an ax to grind.

Let's face it, deep down in our heart of hearts we knew the honeymoon wouldn't last forever. Our willingness to place eternal faith in an earth-straddling company that oversees the largest collection of information ever assembled was doomed to end in a bitter divorce from the start. After all, each corporation, just like humans, has their own political proclivities, and Google is certainly no exception. But we aren't talking about your average car company here.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The short answer, if you do not want your life surveilled by Google, is to use alternative search engines which are censorship free, like Yandex, or DuckDuckGo, while you still can.

Sep 11 11:30

COULD THIS BE THE BIGGEST BIOTECH BREAKTHROUGH OF THE YEAR?

Someone dies of a stroke every 4 minutes in the United States. Globally, 15 million people suffer a stroke every year. It’s debilitating physically and financially—but one little-known company has developed a medical device that hopes to challenge that deadly statistic.

It’s been quietly developing this new technology for 10 years. Now it’s released updated preliminary clinical trial results, and signed a manufacturing deal which could make a significant impact in the medical device industry.

After a decade of painstaking development, we’re now nearing the end of the long road to validation, and for investors who understand this industry, this could be the critical juncture.

The little-known company is CVR Medical (TSX:CVM.V; OTC:CRRVF), and its potentially life-saving device is the Carotid Stenotic Scan (CSS)--a technology designed to detect stenosis within arteries, or Ischemia, which is the leading indicator of strokes.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Fingers crossed; this technology could, potentially, save a lot of lives.

Sep 11 09:24

Do You Trust Snopes? You Won’t After Reading This.

The big players in the GMO and agrochemical industry – Monsanto, Bayer, Dow, Syngenta, DuPont – are engaging in an extensive public relations, advertising, lobbying and political campaigning to make sure that genetically engineered crops (GMOs), and the chemical pesticides they require, continue to proliferate in the U.S.

To improve their public image, they are attempting to manipulate everything we see and hear about GMO crops and pesticides in the media and on TV, the internet and print articles – using propaganda-laden commercials, “mommy-blogger” articles, farmer endorsements, hired operatives to change Wikipedia, and front group websites. The biotech industry is feeling threatened, and their profits hang in the balance. They are trying to silence the truth!

We now have evidence that the website Snopes.com is being manipulated by the industry too. But first, let’s examine what Snopes really is…

Sep 11 07:07

Facebook is fined £1.1m by Spanish watchdog for failing to stop its users' data being tapped by advertisers

Spain's data protection watchdog said Monday it has slapped Facebook with a fine of £1.1 million (1.2 million euros/$1.44 million) for failing to prevent its users' data being accessed by advertisers.

Facebook has collected personal data from its users in Spain without obtaining their 'unequivocal consent' and without informing them how such information would be used, the Spanish Data Protection Agency said in a statement.

'Facebook collects data on ideology, sex, religious beliefs, personal tastes or navigation without clearly informing about the use and purpose that it will give them,' the statement said.

Sep 11 06:55

Virginia scraps poke-to-vote machines hackers destroyed at DefCon

With the DefCon bods showing some machines shared a single hard-coded password, Virginia directed the Virginia Information Technology Agency (VITA) to audit the machines in use in the state (the Accuvote TSX, the Patriot, and the AVC Advantage).

None passed the test. VITA told the board “each device analysed exhibited material risks to the integrity or availability of the election process”, and the lack of a paper audit trail posed a significant risk of lost votes.

Local outlet The News Leader notes that many precincts had either replaced their machines already, or are in the process of doing so.

The election board's decision will force a change-over on the 140 precincts that haven't replaced their machines, covering 190,000 of Virginia's ~8.4m population.

Sep 11 06:54

Everybody without Android Oreo vulnerable to overlay attack

Any unpatched Android phone running a version older than Oreo is going to need patching fairly soon, with researchers turning up a class of vulnerability that lets malware draw fake dialogs so users “okay” their own pwnage.

Sep 11 06:47

44m UK consumers on Equifax's books. How many pwned? Blighty eagerly awaits SPEX ON THE BREACH

The impact of the Equifax breach in the UK remains unclear days after the disclosure of a breach that could potentially affect up to 44 million British consumers.

The credit reference agency and its UK subsidiaries provide services for UK companies including BT, Capital One and British Gas. Customers of these companies might therefore be affected by the attack despite not having signed up for Equifax's services.

Sep 11 06:45

Researcher Discloses 10 Zero-Day Flaws in D-Link 850L Wireless Routers

A security researcher has discovered not one or two but a total of ten critical zero-day vulnerabilities in routers from Taiwan-based networking equipment manufacturer D-Link which leave users open to cyber attacks.

D-Link DIR 850L wireless AC1200 dual-band gigabit cloud routers are vulnerable to 10 security issues, including "several trivial" cross-site scripting (XSS) flaws, lack of proper firmware protection, backdoor access, and command injection attacks resulting in root access.

If successfully exploited, these vulnerabilities could allow hackers to intercept connection, upload malicious firmware, and get root privileges, enabling them to remotely hijack and control affected routers, as well as network, leaving all connected devices vulnerable to cyber attacks as well.

Sep 10 09:12

Rohrabacher Calls For Hearings On Clinton Foundation Collusion With Russia

California Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher released a statement on Thursday calling for hearings regarding possible collusion between the Clinton Foundation and Russia. Rohrabacher sent a letter to House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce on Wednesday.

Disobedient Media previously reported on Rohrabacher’s meeting with Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, with Rohrabacher alleging in the wake of the visit that information may be forthcoming which could completely disprove Russian hacking claims. CNN reported Rohrabacher’s desire to brief Trump personally on the issue, though it remains unclear when or if such a meeting will take place.

In the wake of his meeting with Assange, Rohrabacher also alluded to the possibility that Assange could receive a pardon and could finally have an opportunity to leave the Ecuadorian embassy after over five years arbitrary confinement.

Sep 10 09:11

Media Takes Advantage Of Irma—Silences Wikileaks Latest Data Dump—Wait Until You See What It Is

Sep 10 09:10

Day 324.4 Imran's Dirty Dozen Fake Employees

Sep 10 08:23

Woman Sues Background Check Site After Husband Uses Site To Catch Her Cheating

Mary from Dallas Texas filed a lawsuit against background check site Persopo.com this month in court. In her lawsuit, she alleges Persopo.com provided her husband with “confidential” information about her. Her husband divorced her based off this information and she wants Persopo.com to pay.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The woman was cheating on her husband, apparently with multiple men, and the husband found out through Persopo.com. The woman, whom I suspect is a liberal, blames the website and not her own behavior.

Sep 09 15:57

Credit Agency Equifax Threatened To Pay Up In Bitcoin Or Else

By Aaron Kesel

Credit reporting agency Equifax was hacked, potentially endangering 143 million Americans’ social security numbers, birth dates, and other private information. Unless, according to the alleged hackers who hacked them, Equifax pays the 600 BTC ransom (2.6 million dollars) by September 15th, according to a Darkweb onion site.

The supposed hackers note that they won’t publicly post credit card numbers of the credit agency, suggesting they may pawn them on Darkweb carding forums...

Sep 09 11:52

F-35 firmware patches to be rolled out 'like iPhone updates'

'I see you're trying to land. Please reboot the flight control system to continue'

Sep 09 11:48

Mexican tax refund site left 400GB of sensitive customer info wide open

Mexican VAT refund site MoneyBack exposed sensitive customer information online as a result of a misconfigured database.

A CouchDB database featuring half a million customers' passport details, credit card numbers, travel tickets and more was left publicly accessible, security firm Kromtech reports. More than 400GB of sensitive information could be either downloaded or viewed because of a lack of access controls before the system was recently secured.

The data includes 455,038 scanned documents, including 88,623 unique passport numbers, related to people who were claiming a tax refund for goods purchased south of the border. Passports identified included those held by citizens of the US, Canada, Argentina, Colombia, Italy, and many more. Data from 2016 and 2017 featured in the exposure.

Sep 09 11:46

Hackers Can Remotely Access Syringe Infusion Pumps to Deliver Fatal Overdoses

Medical devices are increasingly found vulnerable to hacking. Earlier this month, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recalled 465,000 pacemakers after they were found vulnerable to hackers.

Now, it turns out that a syringe infusion pump used in acute care settings could be remotely accessed and manipulated by hackers to impact the intended operation of the device, ICS-CERT warned in an advisory issued on Thursday.

An independent security researcher has discovered not just one or two, but eight security vulnerabilities in the Medfusion 4000 Wireless Syringe Infusion Pump, which is manufactured by Minnesota-based speciality medical device maker Smiths Medical.

The devices are used across the world for delivering small doses of medication in acute critical care, such as neonatal and pediatric intensive care and the operating room.

Sep 09 09:59

REPORTER BARRETT BROWN JAILED 5 YEARS FOR JOURNALISM JUST LAUNCHED NEW SYSTEM TO EXPOSE CORRUPTION

The Pursuance Project, billed as the “world’s first comprehensive framework for process democracy,” was conceived with mass online collaboration in mind. Brown, who served five years in federal prison for leaking information as part of the PM Project — which sought to make transparent the abuses of the surveillance state — believes the full promise of the Internet is yet to be realized. The Pursuance Project, which he calls a “civic collaboration network,” will leverage online tools and relationships to create “a vast and formidable ecosystem of opposition to institutionalized injustice.”

Barrett Brown learned many lessons from his years of harassment at the hands of the Department of Justice. One of these lessons, it seems, was most certainly not backing down from the fight. And he sees net-driven mass collaboration as the most important arsenal in an information war that is already well underway.

Sep 09 08:39

Best Buy stops sale of Russia-based Kaspersky products

Best Buy Co, the No.1 U.S. electronics retailer, is pulling Kaspersky Lab’s cyber security products from its shelves and website, amid concerns that the Moscow-based firm may be vulnerable to Russian government influence.

Sep 09 07:07

Case study of LAPD and Palantir's predictive policing tool: same corruption; new, empirical respectability

UT Austin sociologist Sarah Brayne spent 2.5 years conducting field research with the LAPD as they rolled out Predpol, a software tool that is supposed to direct police to places where crime is likely to occur, but which has been shown to send cops out to overpolice brown and poor people at the expense of actual crimefighting.

Sep 09 05:21

Equifax Lobbied To Kill Rule Protecting Victims Of Data Breaches

If you want to know if you were one of the 143 million people whose data was breached in a hack of Equifax’s data, the company has a website you can use to find out — but there appears to be a catch: To check, you have to agree to give up your legal right to sue the company for damages. The outrage that clause has now generated could complicate the company’s efforts — backed by Republican lawmakers — to block an imminent rule that would ban companies from forcing customers to agree to such provisions.

Sep 09 05:20

Is Equifax Data On The Dark Web? Not Yet, But It Will Be

Following the security breach of credit reporting firm Equifax that resulted in the personal information of an upwards of 143 million Americans being stolen, researchers are searching to find who executed the hack and where the stolen data will end up—though thus far the clues have been sparse.

With any data breach, but especially one the size of the Equifax incident, it seems inevitable that the stolen information will end up on the dark web—either sold off to the highest bidder or in bits and pieces that allow black market buyers to purchase and use stolen information.

In the case of the Equifax hack, there is plenty of personal information to go around. The credit reporting firm said Thursday the credit card numbers of approximately 209,000 consumers in the United States were accessed by an unauthorized source. It also confirmed the hackers gained access to the personally identifying information of 182,000 U.S. consumers.

Sep 09 05:16

Equifax Hit With $70 Billion Lawsuit After Leaking 143 Million Social Security Numbers

One day after Equifax announced (more than one month after it itself had learned) that its systems had been hacked, resulting in up to 143 million social security numbers, names, addresses, driver’s license data, birth dates, some credit card numbers and pretty much all other critical personal data being leaked and currently for sale somewhere on the dark web, the company whose job is, ironically, to protect the credit and personal information of hundreds of millions of Americans has been hit with a monster class-action lawsuit seeking as much as $70 billion.

Sep 09 05:16

Equifax Data Breach is a 10 out of 10 Scandal

The hacking of consumer credit reporting giant Equifax, and the company's 'cynical' handling of it, is a far-reaching disaster that borders on criminal, says financial regulation expert Bill Black

Sep 09 05:13

Equifax data breach: Find out if you were one of 143 million hacked

Editor's note, September 8: We recommend that anyone with a credit history assume they were affected by the hack, as Equifax's hack-checker tool proved unreliable in our tests.

Also, Equifax will suggest you enroll in Trusted ID, which includes a Terms of Service agreement that waives your rights to a class-action lawsuit against the company. CNET is investigating the issue and is not yet sure if these terms will hold up in court.

Sep 09 04:53

Top US Electronics Retailer Best Buy Stops Selling Kaspersky Lab Software

Best Buy reportedly will stop selling Kaspersky Lab cybersecurity software due to fears that the company has links to the Russian government.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Yet another reason not to shop at Best Buy!

Sep 08 15:44

What Is DTube? - Why It Can Replace YouTube! (FULL Report)

https://dtube.video/

Published on Aug 20, 2017Josh Sigurdson breaks down the new streaming video platform "DTube" and how it can actually break down the barriers so many YouTube creators face today.

DTube is a decentralized streaming video platform linked to Steemit (the decentralized social media) which allows users to upload videos easily and make money (or cryptocurrency) via the upvotes or likes on their post. As YouTube brings in the Anti-Defamation League to demonetize content and label it as "hate speech", DTube couldn't have come at a better time.

...

Sep 08 13:33

Here are all the ways the Equifax data breach is worse than you can imagine

Another day, another massive data breach. Except this one involves Equifax, one of the credit-monitoring companies you might expect to be ultrasensitive to the importance of safeguarding your personal information from hackers.

Instead, the company revealed on Thursday, the personal data of 143 million U.S. consumers in its care — nearly half the country — was potentially compromised. The data now at large includes names, Social Security numbers, birthdates, addresses and driver’s license numbers, all of which can be used fraudulently to validate the identity of someone trying to open a bank or credit account in another person’s name.

In some cases, Equifax says, the security questions and answers used on some websites to verify users’ identity may also have been exposed. Having that information in hand would allow hackers to change their targets’ passwords and other account settings.

Sep 08 11:41

URGENT: SOUTHFRONT’S WORK IS FULLY BLOCKED ON YOUTUBE

The project’s YouTube channel received two community guidelines strikes over the past 48 hours. With two community guidelines strikes, SouthFront cannot upload new videos on YouTube. Work on YouTube is now fully blocked.

Sep 08 09:33

AMD is gaining ground on Intel faster than analysts had thought

In March, Intel processors represented 72.4% of total unit sales. Ryzen launched on March 2, giving AMD a full month of ramp time. The company was able to capture 27.6% of the market. AMD sales rose every month since then, hitting 48.7% in July and 56.1% in August, overtaking Intel for the first time in nearly a decade.

Sep 08 09:28

Equifax Faces Multibillion-Dollar Lawsuit Over Hack

A proposed class-action lawsuit was filed against Equifax Inc. late Thursday evening, shortly after the company reported that an unprecedented hack had compromised the private information of about 143 million people.

In the complaint filed in Portland, Ore., federal court, users alleged Equifax was negligent in failing to protect consumer data, choosing to save money instead of spending on technical safeguards that could have stopped the attack.

Sep 08 09:26

Bug in Windows Kernel Could Prevent Security Software From Identifying Malware

Malware developers can abuse a programming error in the Windows kernel to prevent security software from identifying if, and when, malicious modules have been loaded at runtime.

The bug affects PsSetLoadImageNotifyRoutine, one of the low-level mechanisms some security solutions use to identify when code has been loaded into the kernel or user space.

The problem is that an attacker can exploit this bug in a way that PsSetLoadImageNotifyRoutine returns an invalid module name, allowing an attacker to disguise malware as a legitimate operation.

Sep 08 09:24

Why the Equifax breach is very possibly the worst leak of personal info ever

The breach Equifax reported Thursday, however, very possibly is the most severe of all for a simple reason: the breath-taking amount of highly sensitive data it handed over to criminals. By providing full names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and, in some cases, driver license numbers, it provided most of the information banks, insurance companies, and other businesses use to confirm consumers are who they claim to be. The theft, by criminals who exploited a security flaw on the Equifax website, opens the troubling prospect the data is now in the hands of hostile governments, criminal gangs, or both and will remain so indefinitely.

Hacks hitting Yahoo and other sites, by contrast, may have breached more accounts, but the severity of the personal data was generally more limited. And in most cases the damage could be contained by changing a password or getting a new credit card number.

Sep 08 08:03

Credit company warns 143mn people may be affected in data breach

Equifax Inc. says a breach of their system may affect 143 million people in the US. About 209,000 credit card numbers were also compromised, marking one of the worst breaches in US history due the scope and importance of information exposed.

The Equifax breach is different than other situations where data is compromised, due to the possibility that consumers may not be aware they are customers of the company. This occurs because Equifax obtains its data from credit card companies, retailers, banks and lenders which report on credit activity of individuals to credit reporting agencies, CNN reported Thursday.

Sep 08 07:52

Security firm Mandiant said to be helping Equifax in hack aftermath

Equifax earlier on Thursday revealed a massive data breach of 143 million consumers.

Sep 08 07:51

Three Equifax execs sold $1.8million of stock days after massive data breach - which wasn't revealed to the public for more than six weeks

Equifax says that three company executives who sold stock just days after the company discovered a major security breach were not aware of the hack at the time.

On Thursday, the company disclosed a cyberattack that ran from mid-May to July. The attack exposed the Social Security numbers and other sensitive information of about 143 million Americans.
Equifax said it detected the hack on July 29.

On August 1 and August 2, Equifax Chief Financial Officer John Gamble and two other executives, Rodolfo Ploder and Joseph Loughran, sold a combined $1.8million in stock.

Sep 08 07:43

New AI can guess whether you're gay or straight from a photograph

An algorithm deduced the sexuality of people on a dating site with up to 91% accuracy, raising tricky ethical questions

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