Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight

The eruption at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano continues. The lava has now destroyed at least 35 structures and covered the equivalent of more than 75 football fields.

Scientists have been tracking this event since it started last week — but there are still big unanswered questions, the biggest of which is when it will end.

The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has been erupting for more than 30 years. Lava levels in the Pu'u O'o crater and the volcano's summit rose in recent weeks, says Wendy Stovall, a volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. They were "inflating like a balloon, because magma was getting backed up from below," she says.

Then last week, the magma at Pu'u O'o plummeted. "The whole bottom of the crater floor dropped out and the magma completely drained away from that system," says Stovall.

Scientists don't know what started this latest event, but there are two possibilities, says Stovall: "Either there's an increase in magma supply, or something blocked the system, something blocked the pathway out of the system."

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