THE DEADLIEST SCHOOL ATTACK IN THE US WAS ERASED FROM HISTORY BECAUSE IT WASN’T DONE WITH A GUN | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


THE DEADLIEST SCHOOL ATTACK IN THE US WAS ERASED FROM HISTORY BECAUSE IT WASN’T DONE WITH A GUN

As the media and the government continue to use the tragic shooting at a Parkland, Florida high school to push their various agendas, it is important to remember that psychopaths who want to kill a lot of people—will do so with or without a gun. In fact, the deadliest attack on a school to ever take place on US soil was done so without a single round being fired.

In Bath Township, Michigan, 44 people, mostly children, lost their lives when a man by the name of Andrew Kehoe blew the town’s school. This attack is often disregarded by history as it paints a different narrative outside of the normal problem, reaction, solution of grabbing guns. As a result, it has largely been erased from the narrative.

As Smithsonian.com reports, the local institute of learning was Bath Consolidated School, built only five years earlier to replace the scattered one-room schools of the surrounding farmland. It had 314 students from around the region, many the sons and daughters of farmers. Some students were bused in, and all took classes with their peers over the course of elementary and high school.

Kehoe, an electrition, had snapped and become angry after the town’s taxes levied on his farm had forced him into foreclosure.

“He was notified last June that the mortgage on his farm would be foreclosed, and that may have been the circumstance that started the clockwork of anarchy and madness in his brain,” claimed the New York Times.

So, while he worked at the school as an electrician, he wired it with explosives. Luckily for half of the students in the school, the timer on one of Kehoe’s homemade explosives failed to go off so the tragedy could’ve been far worse. However, the catastrophe resulting from the 38 children and 6 adults who died was still utterly horrific.

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