For Mormon offshoot groups in Mexico, a history of family traditions — and violence | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

For Mormon offshoot groups in Mexico, a history of family traditions — and violence

The families killed Monday in an ambush in Mexico highlight the long history of fundamentalist offshoots of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that originally fled from the U.S. to Mexico to practice polygamy.
Family members said the victims, who include nine women and children, were members of a fundamentalist community in the state of Sonora and had dual U.S. and Mexican citizenship.
One of the eight colonias, Colonia LeBaron, was founded by Alma Dayer LeBaron in the 1920s. LeBaron was among the fundamentalists who moved to Mexico to evade U.S. law enforcement and continue practicing polygamy.

One of his sons, Ervil LeBaron, founded his own fundamentalist polygamist church, called the Church of the Firstborn, that later took on a cult following in the 1970s. He ordered the killing of his rivals and justified violence with the religious doctrine of blood atonement. He was later arrested and extradited from Mexico to Utah, where he was sentenced to life in prison, where he died in 1981. Latter-day Saints families from Utah began settling in Chihuahua and Sonora in the mid-1880s as the United States began placing restrictions on polygamy.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA