NATO starts training Azerbaijani army for psychological and information operations during crisis | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

NATO starts training Azerbaijani army for psychological and information operations during crisis

The Ministry of Defense of Azerbaijan reports that the Mobile Training Group of NATO Allied Joint Forces Command conducts a Training Course on "Psychological & information operations during crisis" in Baku since 24 October.

“The aim of Course to be held until 28 October is the planning and implementation of psychological operations during operations in response to crises, as well as the preparation of presentations concerning the experience obtained in this area and use of guidance documents, organization of work in syndicate groups,” the Ministry informed.

The Course was organized within the framework of the Individual Partnership & Cooperation Programme between the Ministry of Defense of Azerbaijan and NATO for 2016.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The question needs to be asked: why this NATO training of Azerbaijani troops, and why now?!?

The answer can be found in the following map:

Map of Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Nagoro Karabakh

Armenia is a major ally of Russia; as reported at globalsecurity.org:

Armenia on 01 January 2015 became a full-fledged member of the Eurasian Economic Union [EEU], the Russia-led trade bloc, which also includes Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. The EU-like integration project includes a common customs policy, free trade, free movement of labor and other measures aimed at boosting the economies of member states. Armenian leaders have repeatedly stated that they are not seeking NATO membership and will remain part of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), the Russian-dominated alliance of six ex-Soviet states. Russia counts on Armenia to be its ally in the Caucasus. Armenia recognizes its reliance -- even dependence -- on Russia's continued support on security and trade issues and will remain a loyal supporter of Russian policies where it counts. Russia can rely on continued Armenian support for its military presence and for the majority of its positions in international fora such as the OSCE. Armenia can count on Russia for its role as mediator in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. Complementarity remains the watchword of Armenian foreign policy, but when push comes to shove, Russia remains Armenia's key ally. Russia has a closer relationship with Armenia than with any other country in the South Caucasus. After the Soviet Union collapsed, Armenia's national security continued to depend heavily on the Russian military. The officer corps of the new national army created in 1992 included many Armenian former officers of the Soviet army, and Russian institutes trained new Armenian officers. Two Russian divisions were transferred to Armenian control, but another division remained under full Russian control on Armenian soil.

The bone of contention in Armenian and Azerbaijan relations is the conflict over the Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, which was overtaken by Armenian nationalists in 1988, and the feud has grown worse, with sporadic outbursts of military conflict. As reported at economist.com in April of this year:

WITH so many conflicts in the world, Nagorno-Karabakh gets little attention. The bloody fighting between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces in the mountainous enclave this week was a reminder that it should. Tanks and artillery traded fire; at least 50 people were killed in four days. The spectre loomed of a wider war, one that could draw in Russia, Turkey and Iran. A ceasefire brokered in Moscow on April 5th appears to be holding for now. But it brought the two foes no closer to peace. The fighting dates back to 1988, when Nagorno-Karabakh’s ethnic Armenians attempted to secede from Azerbaijan. (At the time, both Armenia and Azerbaijan were republics of the Soviet Union.) As the Soviet Union broke apart in 1991, the conflict grew into a full-scale war. By 1994 some 30,000 people were dead and Nagorno-Karabakh was under Armenian control. Russia, America and France brokered a ceasefire, but sporadic shooting continued. Rather than time healing old wounds, it deepened them. On April 2nd the frustration spilled over. Azerbaijani forces seized settlements and strategic heights along the front. (Both sides accuse each other of starting the fighting.)

Armenia has expressed no desire to join NATO; the Azerbaijani government wants Nagorno-Karabakh back, and is being trained by NATO "advisors" about the psychological and informational aspects to "crisis" situations (translation: the psychological and informational aspects to war.)

Were I a betting woman, I would almost be willing to bet that NATO is preparing the Azerbaijani military for another round against Armenia over Nagorno-Karabakh; such an action, of course, would be yet another potential "back door war" against Russia, with Russia coming in on the Armenian side, and NATO and the US on the Azerbaijani side. Turkey and Iran could wind up getting involved, and this could create a monster, global military conflict.

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