Odious debt | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Odious debt

In international law, odious debt is a legal theory which holds that the national debt incurred by a regime for purposes that do not serve the best interests of the nation, such as wars of aggression, should not be enforceable. Such debts are thus considered by this doctrine to be personal debts of the regime that [are] incurred [by]them and not debts of the state. In some respects, the concept is analogous to the invalidity of contracts signed under coercion.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Under this principle, We The People are not liable for the costs of the wars of aggression in Afghanistan and Iraq and Somalia; indeed pretty much every war since WW2.

Nor are we liable for the $12.8 trillion spent on the bailouts, since these funds did not benefit the public, but only the banks and brokerages.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA