Scientists Alter Crops With Techniques Outside Regulators’ Scope | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Scientists Alter Crops With Techniques Outside Regulators’ Scope

Scotts and several other companies are developing genetically modified crops using techniques that either are outside the jurisdiction of the Agriculture Department or use new methods — like “genome editing” — that were not envisioned when the regulations were created.

The department has said, for example, that it has no authority over a new herbicide-resistant canola, a corn that would create less pollution from livestock waste, switch grass tailored for biofuel production, and even an ornamental plant that glows in the dark.

The trend alarms critics of biotech crops, who say genetic modification can have unintended effects, regardless of the process.

“They are using a technical loophole so that what are clearly genetically engineered crops and organisms are escaping regulation,” said Michael Hansen, a senior scientist at Consumers Union. He said the grass “can have all sorts of ecological impact and no one is required to look at it.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

ANY GMO tinkering with any plant can have long-term unintended consequences, which can range from mild to horrific

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