Showdown Tonight At a Washington High School: A Look At 3 Legal Precedents Regarding Praying At Football Games | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Showdown Tonight At a Washington High School: A Look At 3 Legal Precedents Regarding Praying At Football Games

Tonight a football coach in Washington State has vowed to pray at the game, despite his employer's edict forbidding him to do so. Bremerton, Washington assistant High football coach Joe Kennedy has said he is going to stand his ground. Let's look at the three legal precedents on this issue which are being raised by the school district. Because these cases are all actually very interesting and it gives a big clue as to how this controversy will be decided. 1. Santa Fe Ind Sch Dist v Doe (U.S. Supreme Court, 2000) said schools may not allow prayers to be read- even by students - over the public address system at even optional extracurricular events, such as football games: "The choice between whether to attend these games or to risk facing a personally offensive religious ritual is in no practical sense an easy one. The Constitution, moreover, demands that the school may not force this difficult choice upon these students."
2. Doe v Duncanville Indep. Sch. Dist. (1995) ruled that schools may not allow coaches to initiate, lead, or supervise student prayer. It all began with a seventh grade girl on a basketball team.
3. Borden v. Sch. Dist. of the Township of East Brunswick New Jersey (2008) ruled that schools may not even allow coaches to participate in or appear to endorse religious activity that is entirely student-initiated. This case involved Jewish Cheerleaders, and the ADL was even involved.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA