Swallowed by the sea: How ten years after Katrina, Louisiana's fishing towns are disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Swallowed by the sea: How ten years after Katrina, Louisiana's fishing towns are disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico

Rocky Morales is watching his small Louisiana town of Delacroix slowly melt into the water. The woods where he played hide-and-seek as a boy are gone. It's all water and mud back there now. So, too, is the nearby marsh where townsfolk once trapped for muskrat, otter and mink.

Many of the fishermen who once lived here — his friends and relatives — have disappeared as well, fleeing behind the intricate levee system protecting New Orleans out of fear that one more hurricane will be all it takes to send the rest of Delacroix into the sea.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast - killing more than 1,830 people and causing more than $150billion in damage in the nation's costliest disaster - New Orleans has been fortified by a new $14.5-billion flood protection system.

But outside the iconic city, efforts have lagged to protect small towns and villages losing land every year to erosion. And as that land buffer disappears, New Orleans itself becomes more vulnerable.

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