THRESHOLD OF A NUCLEAR CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


THRESHOLD OF A NUCLEAR CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA

One cannot ignore the dual policy of Washington regarding to whom they allow to have nuclear aspirations, and against whom they raise international dudgeon and impose sanctions. We should also remember that today, the threat of nuclear confrontation is exacerbated in five different regions, the least noticeable of which in many publications of American and Western media is South Asia. It is generally accepted that there are, in fact, nine nuclear powers in the world today: The United States, Russia, France, Britain, China, India, Pakistan, Israel and the DPRK. There is a total of about 15,000 nuclear warheads at their disposal (according to the Stockholm Peace Research Institute (SPRI), January 2017). However, only those who signed the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) of 1968 are officially considered as nuclear powers. That is, (in the order the creation of the first atomic bomb in each nation), the USA (1945), the USSR / Russia (1949), Great Britain (1952), France (1960) and China (1964). The remaining four countries, although they have nuclear weapons, have not signed the NPT. North Korea previously withdrew from the treaty. Israel never officially acknowledged the existence of nuclear weapons on its territory, but it is believed that Tel Aviv has such a weapon. In 2008, the SPRI reported that Israel has twice the number of nuclear weapons than India and Pakistan. All opportunities, both scientific developments and production facilities, for the creation of nuclear warheads are available in Iran and South Africa. There is also a group of ‘latent’ nuclear states capable of producing nuclear weapons but refraining from doing so because of economic and political costs. These include Japan, Brazil, Argentina, Saudi Arabia.
By actively developing tactical nuclear weapons, Pakistan has practically entered the VIP club of countries that have such weapons. At present, the Pakistani arsenal of nuclear weapons, according to the SPRI, is the sixth largest in the world. At the same time, American analysts state in a report prepared for the Carnegie Foundation that Islamabad can become the world’s third largest nuclear power after Russia and the United States if Pakistan maintains current production rates ...

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Old_Logan

the USA (1945), the USSR / Russia (1949), Great Britain (1952), France (1960) and China (1964).

(*And bear in mind , Trump played Let's Make A weapons Deal with Japan while on his Asian 'visit' .)

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