Why would the Navy buy more ships when it is incapable of competently managing what it has? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Why would the Navy buy more ships when it is incapable of competently managing what it has?

Anyone can have a bad decade: the United States Navy has had four. It started in 1989. In April of that year, the number two turret on the battleship U.S.S. Iowa exploded, killing 47 crewmen. The Navy bungled the subsequent investigation, blaming the incident on a suicidal sailor they claimed was spurned by his male lover. It wasn’t true: an independent inquiry cleared the sailor, saying the explosion was the likely result of a loading accident. When the sailor’s family demanded an apology, the Navy refused.

Two years later, in September of 1991, during a “Tailhook” symposium of naval aviators at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel, 26 Navy women were assaulted by some 70 male Navy and Marine pilots. The women were forced to run an alcohol-fueled “gauntlet” on the hotel’s third floor, where they were “groped and grabbed” as they ran down a corridor.

The Navy again botched its inquiry, with one investigator claiming that “a lot of female pilots are go-go dancers, topless dancers or hookers.” The Senate Armed Services Committee froze the promotion of 5,000 Navy and Marine officers, the Navy Secretary resigned, the Chief of Naval Operations retired early, and 14 admirals were reprimanded or forced to resign.

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