Appeals court rules due process rights don't apply to Guantanamo detainees | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Appeals court rules due process rights don't apply to Guantanamo detainees

A federal appeals court ruled on Friday that foreign detainees at Guantanamo Bay do not have the right to make due process claims in court.

The decision from the three-judge panel on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Due Process Clause of the Constitution does not apply to those held at the military base.

Judge Neomi Rao, who was appointed to the court by President Trump, wrote in the decision that "the Due Process Clause may not be invoked by aliens without property or presence in the sovereign territory of the United States."

The decision rejects the appeal of Abdulsalam Ali Abdulrahman al Hela, a Yemeni citizen who has been detained at the U.S. military base in Cuba since 2004. A district judge last year denied al Hela's habeas corpus petition challenging his detention at the facility.

"We think the decision is incorrect and we're considering our options," David Remes, al Hela's attorney, told The Hill on Friday. "The fundamental injustice at Guantanamo is holding individuals indefinitely without a charge. That's the ultimate problem that needs to be addressed."

Friday's decision would likely be the most categorical denial of legal rights for Guantanamo detainees in nearly two decades of court battles over the military prison

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This ruling stinks to high heaven.

"Holding individuals indefinitely without a charge" ?!?

Just because Israel consistently does this to its Palestinian prisoners, does not make it morally right; in fact, it makes such a practice morally repugnant.

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