Five things to know about emerging US, Taliban peace deal | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Five things to know about emerging US, Taliban peace deal

The hardest part is yet to come.

Skeptics of the Trump administration's peace efforts have long said the most difficult part will be intra-Afghan talks.

It's also the most critical part, they say, because peace won't happen without political reconciliation in Afghanistan.

The Taliban has previously resisted talks with the Afghan government, which it sees as a puppet of the United States.

Political turmoil within the Afghan government could also complicate talks by giving Afghan President Ashraf Ghani a weakened hand.

Ghani was just declared the winner of the September 2019 presidential elections this past week. But he got only 50.64 percent of the vote, just a smidge above the 50 percent needed to win.

And his chief rival, Abdullah Abdullah, is still disputing the election results, claiming victory himself and pledging to form a government of his own.

Lawmakers remain skeptical.

Given the difficulties of intra-Afghan talks and questions about the Taliban's trustworthiness, lawmakers are cautioning against declaring the end of the Afghanistan war quite yet.

As the Trump administration appeared on the cusp of the deal announced Friday, lawmakers in both parties told The Hill that peace was still a long way off.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Had the war criminal President Bush simply paid the price the Taliban was originally asking for lease of Afghanistan pipelines in 2001, none of this would ever have happened.

9/11 and the Afghan Pipeline

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