SAUDI EXECUTES INDONESIA MAID WHO KILLED ‘ABUSIVE’ EMPLOYER IN SELF-DEFENCE | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


SAUDI EXECUTES INDONESIA MAID WHO KILLED ‘ABUSIVE’ EMPLOYER IN SELF-DEFENCE

Saudi Arabia has come under fire once again after it executed an Indonesian female migrant worker without notifying her family or the Indonesian government.

Seven years after being sentenced to death for killing her employer in an act she claimed was self-defence from sexual abuse, Tuti Tursilawati was executed on Monday in the city of Taif.

President of Indonesia Joko Widodo criticised the decision today, saying the government has officially protested to Riyadh and demanded better protection for Indonesian workers in the country.

Tursilawati was executed just a week after Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister, Adel Al-Jubeir, met with his Indonesian counterpart and President Widodo in Jakarta to discuss migrant workers’ rights.

Tursilawati’s execution is believed to be the fourth time Saudi Arabia failed to give notice before carrying out a death penalty on an Indonesian migrant worker in the past three years. However, this execution comes at a particularly sensitive moment for the kingdom which is under immense global pressure to explain the killing of prominent journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The case of Tursilawati dates back to 2010 when she was charged with killing her employer. She claimed she was acting in self-defence because she was being sexually abused.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

She should never have gone to Saudi Arabia for work in the first place.

Women are completely disposable here; and particularly Asian women hoping to find work, where none really exists for them at all back home, are considered the most disposable.

Saudi men are of the opinion that women in their country can be dealt with in any way they chose, including abusing them, secure that the government will do absolutely nothing to them if they indulge in these kinds of practices, because these are "behavioural norms" for men who come from families with money.

This Saudi attitude toward women, coupled with this execution, should be a cautionary tale writ large, for Asian women hoping to get a better job in Saudi Arabia, where the risks definitely outweigh the benefits.

I would never, this lifetime, willingly, go to Riyadh; I would, however, love to see Tehran, because of the incredible history, art, and music, and science I know I would find there. I would love to talk with their young people, and see what dreams they have for their future, and how they see themselves shaping that future.

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