Japan prepares for release of tritium from Fukushima plant | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Japan prepares for release of tritium from Fukushima plant

To dump or not to dump a little-discussed substance is the question brewing in Japan as it grapples with the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima five years ago. The substance is tritium.

The radioactive material is nearly impossible to remove from the huge quantities of water used to cool melted-down reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, which was wrecked by the massive tsunami in northeastern Japan in March 2011.

The water is still accumulating since 300 tons are needed every day to keep the reactors chilled. Some is leaking into the ocean.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Build a giant electrolysis plant. Tritium in its gaseous state is one of the most valuable materials in the world, used in gunsights, watch dials, emergency lights, etc. Yes, it is radioactive, but a beta emitter. It's a lot safer strapped to your wrist than in the water and food you ingest!

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