Waive Jones Act for Hawaii for Hurricane Lane | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Waive Jones Act for Hawaii for Hurricane Lane

As Hawaii waits to see what devastation Hurricane Lane may bring to its shores, Keli‘i Akina, president of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, is calling on the federal government to issue the state a temporary waiver from the Jones Act before any damage is done.

“The hurricane has not made contact with all the islands as of yet,” Akina said on Wednesday, “but lawmakers should take the necessary steps to prepare for the worst. By waiving us from the Jones Act before Hurricane Lane hits, ships will be able to bring supplies and aid as they make their already-scheduled transits.”

Waiving the Jones Act for areas affected by hurricane disasters has had explicit positive results. Waivers contributed to reducing the number of gas stations experiencing fuel outages in Florida after Hurricane Irma by more than 60 percent, according to GasBuddy. They’ve also helped stabilize fuel prices across the nation, preventing bigger price spikes.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act is known as the Jones Act and deals with cabotage (coastwise trade) and requires that all goods transported by water between U.S. ports be carried on U.S.-flag ships, constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents.[2] The act was introduced by Senator Wesley Jones.

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