Hand-washing: a luxury millions of Yemenis can't afford | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Hand-washing: a luxury millions of Yemenis can't afford

Hand-washing to combat the spread of coronavirus is the order of the day, but it's an unaffordable luxury for millions in war-ravaged Yemen where clean water is dangerously scarce.

Yemen's broken healthcare system has yet to register any cases of the disease, but if the pandemic does hit, the impact will be unimaginable in a country where five years of conflict has created what the United Nations calls the world's worst humanitarian crisis.

Five years after a Saudi-led military coalition intervened in Yemen to support the government against the Iran-backed Huthi rebels, some 80 percent of the population is in need of aid.

- Cholera and disease -

Yemen suffered one of its worst ever outbreaks of cholera in 2017.

"Years of under-investment in public water and sanitation systems provided the foundations for this outbreak," Bismarck Swangin, UNICEF Yemen's chief of communications, told AFP.

"The risk still remains if access to water continues to be low."

Tens of thousands of people -- most of them civilians -- have been killed since March 2015 when the Saudi-led coalition intervened in the war that has pushed the country to the brink of famine.

The conflict, which shows no signs of abating, has crippled the country's healthcare system and paved the way for the spread of diseases.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What this article deliberately avoids naming and shaming, is the US military's having enabled Saudi destruction of Yemen, including live fire taking the lives of infants; toddlers; women, and the medically fragile elderly; they have enabled the complete destruction of water infrastructure, guaranteeing that the water will nearly certainly cause disease; and prevented aid ships from getting in to Yemen, to provide desperately needed food aid.

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