Santa Susana Field Laboratory | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Santa Susana Field Laboratory

The Hot Lab suffered a number of fires involving radioactive materials. For example, in 1957, a fire in the Hot Cell "got out of control and ... massive contamination" resulted. (see: NAA-SR-1941, Sodium Graphite Reactor, Quarterly Progress Report, January–March 1957).

At least four of the ten nuclear reactors suffered accidents: 1) The AE6 reactor experienced a release of fission gases in March 1959.[17] 2) In July 1959, the site suffered a partial nuclear meltdown that has been named "the worst in U.S. history", releasing an undisclosed amount of radioactivity, but thought to be much more than the Three Mile Island disaster in 1979.[18] Another radioactive fire occurred in 1971, involving combustible primary reactor coolant (NaK) contaminated with mixed fission products.[19][20] The AE6 reactor experienced a release of fission gases in March 1959, the SRE experienced a power excursion and partial meltdown in July 1959; the SNAP8ER in 1964 experienced damage to 80% of its fuel; and the SNAP8DR in 1969 experienced similar damage to one-third of its fuel.[21] 3) The SNAP8ER in 1964 experienced damage to 80% of its fuel.[22] 4) The SNAP8DR in 1969 experienced similar damage to one-third of its fuel.[23]
The reactors located on the grounds of SSFL were considered experimental, and therefore had no containment structures. Reactors and highly radioactive components were housed without the large concrete domes that surround modern power reactors.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Santa Susana Field Laboratory is one of the most highly contaminated areas in the nation, combining toxic chemicals from rocket engines and materials tests to radioactive debris from experimental reactors, including an experimental sodium reactor that partially melted down in 1964 but was kept secret for ten years afterwards!

Despite the obvious danger, the Santa Susana Field Laboratory has never been declared a superfund cleanup site due to industry lobbying and tons of the radioactive and toxic debris released by accidents has never been accounted for, and is assumed to have been percolating down into the ground for decades. Some experts claim, based on a five-year study, that the amount of radiation released over the San Fernando Valley was 459 times that which was released at Three Mile Island.

The reason this is important is because the Santa Susana Field Laboratory is located just ten miles southwest of the Porter Ranch gas leak!

This raises the possibility that the methane being poured into the atmosphere is not only carrying toxic components that have reached the gas strata, but that the carbon in the methane itself may be radioactive!

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