Federal Court Says the Government Can Impersonate You on Social Media — and There’s Not Much You Can Do About It | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Federal Court Says the Government Can Impersonate You on Social Media — and There’s Not Much You Can Do About It

In June 2013, Arquiett filed a formal complaint against Sinnigen on the grounds that her privacy was violated. However, the U.S. District Court of the Northern District of New York ruled the DEA did nothing to overstep its authority.

“Defendants admit that Plaintiff did not give express permission for the use of photographs contained on her phone on an undercover Facebook page, but state the Plaintiff implicitly consented by granting access to the information stored in her cell phone and by consenting to the use of that information to aid in an ongoing criminal investigations,” the court said.

Therefore, the court went on to state, “Plaintiff does not have a First Amendment Right to Privacy in the photographs.”

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