In the six months since Thailand's military coup, the United States has exported tens of millions of dollars' worth of military equipment to the unelected government there | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

In the six months since Thailand's military coup, the United States has exported tens of millions of dollars' worth of military equipment to the unelected government there

In the six months since Thailand's military coup, the United States has exported tens of millions of dollars' worth of military equipment to the unelected government there. This finding is based on a new analysis of US Census Bureau export data conducted by Truthout.

The records, which run through September, show that since the May 22, 2014, coup, the United States has delivered $11 million in parts for military aircraft, more than $1 million in parts for guided missiles and three UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters worth more than $40 million.

The Thai military government, which calls itself the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), has mandated widespread censorship on television, radio, in print and in social media. It has also outlawed criticism of the military authorities, as well as gatherings of more than five people.

The NCPO has also detained more than 300 politicians, activists, journalists and demonstrators since the coup. Many are being held incommunicado at military black sites, and some are alleging torture.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

And just WHY would the US government support a military dictatorship in Thailand?!? For the same bloody reasons it supports such governments all over the world: stability (at the cost of democracy) and US profits.

Please remember the following, as reported in an article published by Mount Holyoke College:

"The Department of Labor indicates that 50% of garment factories in the U.S. violate two or more basic labor laws, establishing them as sweatshops. Sweatshops exist wherever there is an opportunity to exploit workers who lack the knowledge and resources to stand up for themselves. Typical sweatshop employees, ninety percent of whom are women, are young and uneducated. Many of them are recent or undocumented immigrants who are unaware of their legal rights. Young women throughout the world are subject to horrible working conditions and innumerable injustices because corporations, many of which are U.S.-owned, can get away with it."

And as reported at globalethicsnetwork.org last May:

One of the biggest hallmarks of sweatshop labor is that the workers are simply underpaid, especially considering the kinds of working conditions they endure. Minimum wage levels in countries such as Thailand, the Philippines, and China, are significantly lower than that of the United States. The federal minimum wage per hour in the United States is currently at 7.25 dollars, while it is 1.48 dollars in Thailand, 69 cents in the Philippines, and 67 cents in China. However, workers are frequently paid less than these estimates suggest—amounts barely enough to survive on even considering the lower cost of living in these regions.

And ladies, BEFORE you buy any kind of a garment from the after Christmas sales, please look at the tag, and note the country of origin.

Because if we can, finally, buy "fair trade organic coffee", where the people who nurture the plants to maturity and harvest, get some more money for their labor, we should be able to buy "fair trade garments", where the people who do the hardest labor get reasonably rewarded.

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