UNITED STATES JUST PASSED UP OLD SOVIET UNION GULAGS FOR LARGEST PRISON SYSTEM | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

UNITED STATES JUST PASSED UP OLD SOVIET UNION GULAGS FOR LARGEST PRISON SYSTEM

For decades, the Soviet Gulags under Joseph Stalin had been considered some of the worst prisons in all of history. But now things have changed.

The United States has far exceeded the horrific tolls of the gulags. In the Soviet example, there were more than 18 million victims during the gulags’ use over four decades.

Around a million people died in the gulags over the years.

Now, as of 2009, the United States tolls soar higher than 7 million in prison, on probation or in some way caught up in the American prison system.

On the surface that might sound like a lot less than the gulag total above. But when you factor in all who have been put through the US prison system, we find a total that is higher than 19 million. That’s more than the 18 million locked up in the gulag system over those forty years.

Just like the Soviet Gulag System, the American Prison-For-Profit industry sells itself with the pitch that it is about “rehabilitation.” The government even has the audacity to call the prison system the “U.S. Department of Corrections.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The American prison system is an absolute, complete, total failure, and if you don't believe me, take a look at the recidivism rate.

As reported at http://www.nij.gov/topics/corrections/recidivism/pages/welcome.aspx:

National Statistics on Recidivism Bureau of Justice Statistics studies have found high rates of recidivism among released prisoners. One study tracked 404,638 prisoners in 30 states after their release from prison in 2005.[1] The researchers found that: Within three years of release, about two-thirds (67.8 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested. Within five years of release, about three-quarters (76.6 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested. Of those prisoners who were rearrested, more than half (56.7 percent) were arrested by the end of the first year. Property offenders were the most likely to be rearrested, with 82.1 percent of released property offenders arrested for a new crime compared with 76.9 percent of drug offenders, 73.6 percent of public order offenders and 71.3 percent of violent offenders.

IF the American prison system worked, these numbers would not be anywhere near as high.

And it galls me for all the money spent here, the outcome is so absurdly lousy.

In Sweden, they are closing their prisons, because they don't have enough prisoners to fill them. And why?!? Because the entire focus of incarceration is rehabilitation, period, end of discussion. The Swedish model looks to encourage family involvement, so that when a prisoner has served his or her time, they can re-integrate with society, and become productive again.

But particularly with the private prisons, low recidivism rates hurts their bottom line, so when prisoners are released, they are generally worse off, emotionally, physically, and mentally, that they are most probably going to offend again.

This is so morally wrong, both for society and the individual prisoners, that I hardly know where to begin.

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