BOEING, THE FAA, AND WHY TWO 737 MAX PLANES CRASHED | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

BOEING, THE FAA, AND WHY TWO 737 MAX PLANES CRASHED

On Sunday an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed, killing all on board. Five month earlier an Indonesian Lion Air jet crashed near Jakarta. All crew and passengers died. Both airplanes were Boeing 737-8 MAX. Both incidents happened shortly after take off.

Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are now grounded about everywhere except in the United States. That this move follows only now is sad. After the first crash it was already obvious that the plane is not safe to fly.

The Boeing 737 and the Airbus 320 types are single aisle planes with some 150 seats. Both are bread and butter planes sold by the hundreds with a good profit. In 2010 Airbus decided to offer its A-320 with a New Engine Option (NEO) which uses less fuel. To counter the Airbus move Boeing had to follow up. The 737 would also get new engines for a more efficient flight and longer range. The new engines on the 737 MAX are bigger and needed to be placed a bit different than on the older version. That again changed the flight characteristics of the plane by giving it a nose up attitude.

The new flight characteristic of the 737 MAX would have require a retraining of the pilots. But Boeing's marketing people had told their customers all along that the 737 MAX would not require extensive new training. Instead of expensive simulator training for the new type experienced 737 pilots would only have to read some documentation about the changes between the old and the new versions.

To make that viable Boeing's engineers had to use a little trick. They added a 'maneuver characteristics augmentation system' (MCAS) that pitches the nose of the plane down if a sensor detects a too high angle of attack (AoA) that might lead to a stall. That made the flight characteristic of the new 737 version similar to the old one.

But the engineers screwed up.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Translation: Boeing knew that the plane would be unsafe without extensive pilot retraining , but sold it anyway to unsuspecting airline owners.

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg should be held personally, and legally responsible; the manufacturer should have to give back the money it took from these airlines, plus fines, and Muilenburg should be tried and convicted by his peers, for knowingly selling unsafe aircraft.

But that would only happen far away and apart from the situation in the US, where "Justice!" has morphed into " Just US!!, as the battle cry of the elite."

Of course, we all know that this will never happen in this country; the monied rarely eat their own.

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