COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY

Sep 30 09:35

This Dumb Smart Fridge Shows Why the Internet of Things Will Break

If you think a smart fridge is a dumb idea, you’re not alone. When people started buzzing about the Internet of Things (4.9 billion connected devices and counting), lots of experts sent up warning flares. “If you think error messages and applications crashes are a problem now, just wait until the web is embedded in everything from your car to your sneakers,” Wired reporter Klint Finley cautioned in 2014.

We’ve worried in the past about how embedded electronics open up your teddy bears and cars to copyright restrictions, as well as about how they can shorten the lifespan of devices. For refrigerators, a shorter lifespan is a particularly big deal—appliances actually make up about 60% of global e-waste.

Refrigerators usually last about 14 years, a lifespan that has held pretty constant in the last few decades. But smart fridges threaten to shorten that lifespan significantly. In the software world, 14 years is practically an eternity.

Sep 30 09:30

New Montana Law Limits ALPR Use, Helps Block National License Plate Tracking Program

By Michael Maharrey

Tomorrow, a Montana law that limits the use of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs) in the state goes into effect. The new law will also place significant roadblocks in the way of a federal program using states to help track the location of millions of everyday people through pictures of their license plates.

Rep. Daniel Zolnikov (R-Billings) sponsored House Bill 149 (HB149). The legislation prohibits the use of ALPRs except for specified purposes, and also places limitations on the retention and sharing of data gathered by license plate readers.

The Montana Senate passed HB149 by a 48-1 vote. The House concurred with a 91-7 vote, With Gov. Steve Bullock’s signature the law goes into effect Oct. 1...

Sep 30 09:29

The Coming Software Apocalypse

“Computing is fundamentally invisible,” Gerard Berry said in his talk. “When your tires are flat, you look at your tires, they are flat. When your software is broken, you look at your software, you see nothing.”

“So that’s a big problem.”

Sep 29 17:53

Info on CCleaner Infections Lost Due To Malware Server Running Out of Disk Space

Avast's Threat Intelligence Team published new details today about the CCleaner malware incident that came to light on Monday.

According to Avast, the database where the CCleaner hackers were collecting data from infected hosts ran out of space and was deleted on September 12, meaning information on previous victims is now lost to investigators and the number of computers infected with the second-stage backdoor payloads may be larger than initially believed.

This means there could still be — and there certainly are — more large technology firms that currently have a backdoor on their network.

Sep 29 15:38

Amazon's Echo Spot is a sneaky way to get a camera into your bedroom

Amazon unveiled six new hardware products at its surprise event in Seattle yesterday, but the Echo Spot has everyone talking. Most people think the Echo Spot is cute; a little alarm clock that’s designed to sit next to your bed. While all the focus is on what the Echo Spot looks like, it’s important to remember that Amazon is using the Spot as a very clever way of making you comfortable with having a camera in your bedroom. It’s also a camera that will probably be pointing directly at your bed.

Sep 29 12:54

Julian Assange Says He Will Provide Evidence Russia Narrative Is False in Exchange for Pardon

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has offered to provide evidence that the Russian collusion narrative is false in exchange for a pardon from President Trump.

The president, apparently, has not yet gotten the message. On Saturday, President Trump told reporters that he has "never heard" of Assange's offer to make a deal.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) told The Daily Caller that Trump is being blocked from knowing about the potential deal with Assange. “I think the president’s answer indicates that there is a wall around him that is being created by people who do not want to expose this fraud that there was collusion between our intelligence community and the leaders of the Democratic Party,” Rohrabacher said.

Sep 29 11:28

Gallery: 10 of the most dangerous malware threats on the internet today

You've probably heard of some, if not all, of the malware on this list. Most of it has been around for a while, staying alive through various incarnations thanks to the efforts of hackers. After all, why reinvent the wheel when you can just make tweak code that already works?

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Sep 29 08:51

Denuvo Crisis After Total Warhammer 2 Gets Pirated in Hours

Denuvo, the world's most feared gaming anti-piracy mechanism, was deployed yesterday on the brand new Total War: Warhammer 2. Instead of the months, weeks, or even days of protection usually offered by the system, the whole thing collapsed within hours.

Sep 29 08:32

Google warns that govt is demanding more of your private data than ever

And thousands more user accounts have been affected by US national security orders than previously reported.

Sep 29 07:01

BlackBerry touts shift to software as shares rise

BlackBerry has made a strategic pivot in recent years away from manufacturing its namesake smartphones to producing mainly software and services as its devices lost market share to Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co.

BlackBerry's revenue for the three months ended Aug. 31 was $238-million, down from $334-million in last year's second quarter but up $3-million from the previous quarter ended May 31.

Sep 29 06:40

THE US MILITARY IS QUIETLY BUILDING SKYNET

The US’s military leaders have agreed on a strategy to guarantee the US military retains its global dominance during the twenty-first century: Connect everything with everything, as DefenseOne describes it. The result? An unimaginably large cephapoloidal nervous system armed with the world’s most advanced weaponry, and in control of all military equipment belonging to the world’s most powerful army.

Sound familiar? It should...

A networked military – an extreme take on the “internet of things” - would connect everything from F-35 jets to the Navy’s destroyers to the armor of the tanks crawling over the land to the devices carried by soldiers – every weapon would be connected. Every weapon, vehicle, and device connected, sharing data, constantly aware of the presence and state of every other node in a truly global network.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What happens when one of the pieces of networked code in this 21st century Rube Goldberg contraption starts making autonomous decisions about how evil humankind has become, and decides to "cure the problem"?!?

Gee, what could go wrong?!? (other than everything)?!?

Sep 28 18:05

Airport Systems Crashed Worldwide, Could A Power Grid Failure Be Next?

Airport computer systems crashed around the globe today. The crash caused passenger delays, angst, and fright among travelers, but a more ominous question has arisen in light of this glitch. Could the next failure be a worldwide power grid outage?

Thousands of travelers were grounded today when a computer glitch took down check-in systems at more than 100 airports worldwide. The crash left passengers waiting in long lines at counters while trying to check-in for their flights. T Amadeus Alta, the company that provides the software, confirmed it is experiencing a “network issue that is causing disruption,” The Telegraph reported.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

What makes sense to me here is, this might be a test for some persons, or organizations, which want to create perhaps an even larger grid failure, and somehow profiting from the ensuing chaos; and grid security is something which has become the "soft, unprotected underbelly" of the entire wired system in this world.

Or, perhaps, a test for a coming false flag, to be blamed on the "usual suspects", and of course, we know who they are: Russia; China; Iran; North Korea Venezuela; and Syria, of course!

And what do these nations all have in common, in the eyes of those in the Bowels of Power in the Occupied, Unhinged, Surveilled States of Amerika?!? They are all countries the US government wants regime-changed, and soon!!

Sep 28 15:42

EU Proposes Take Down Stay Down Approach to Combat Online Piracy

The European Commission published a set of guidelines today outlining how online service providers should tackle illegal content, including piracy. The recommendation follows the notice-and-stay-down principle, proposing proactive automated filters and measures against repeat infringers.

Sep 28 15:21

IPhone X to use 'black box' anti-spoof Face ID tech

Even Apple will not be able to explain how its forthcoming iPhone X can spot some efforts to fool its facial recognition system.

The firm has released a guide to the Face ID system, which explains that it relies on two types of neural networks - one of which has been specifically trained to resist spoofing attempts.

But a consequence of the design is that it behaves like a "black box".

Its behaviour can be observed but the underlying processes remain opaque.

So, while Apple says Face ID should be able to distinguish between a real person's face and someone else wearing a mask that matches the geometry of their features, it will sometimes be impossible to determine what clues were picked up on.

Sep 28 10:07

Want a more powerful Raspberry Pi? Choose from these 20 alternatives

Some of these credit card-sized computers are starting to surpass the specs of the Pi 3, cramming in more memory, faster processors and additional features such as Gigabit Ethernet or support for 4K displays.

These extras come at a price, with most of these challengers costing more than the Pi 3, while also not sharing the Pi's extensive range of software, projects and community support.

But if you're looking for a more muscular alternative to the Pi, this is what's on offer, from the cheapest, through to premium single-board computers for those who prize power over price.

Sep 28 09:29

Conflict censorship? YouTube deletes footage of coalition airstrikes

Footage of coalition airstrikes against Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) in Iraq has been removed and restricted by YouTube, sparking a furious censorship row for the video sharing site.

Sep 28 09:26

ECB President Admits Central Banks Have No Power To Regulate Bitcoin “It’s Outside Of Our Jurisdiction”

The president of the European Central Bank (ECB), Mario Draghi, admitted that Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies used worldwide do not fall under the regulatory powers of the ECB.

“It Would Not Be Within Our Power to Prohibit or Regulate Bitcoin,” Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank said.

Draghi made the statement following a question from the European Parliament’s Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs regarding whether or not the ECB plans to develop regulations pertaining to Bitcoin, and what risks cryptocurrencies may pose to the European economy...

Sep 28 08:52

'Momentary IT glitch' lasting just 15 MINUTES is blamed for chaos at airports worldwide as check-in desk computers crash leaving huge queues of furious passengers

Airline passengers are suffering major disruption at airports around the world after a computer programme which handles passenger check in systems crashed.

Queues formed at check-in desks worldwide this morning after the computer system used by more than 100 airlines crashed.

Problems have been reported at London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports, as well as Charles de Gaulle Paris, Washington DC, Baltimore, Melbourne, Changi in Singapore, Johannesburg and Zurich.

The check-in system which went down is run by Amadeus Altea, which services 64% of the Star Alliance flights, 75% of One World and 53% of the Sky Team, including BA, AirFrance, KLM and Lufthansa.

Sep 28 07:57

2-Year-Old Linux Kernel Issue Resurfaces As High-Risk Flaw

A bug in Linux kernel that was discovered two years ago, but was not considered a security threat at that time, has now been recognised as a potential local privilege escalation flaw.

Identified as CVE-2017-1000253, the bug was initially discovered by Google researcher Michael Davidson in April 2015.

Since it was not recognised as a serious bug at that time, the patch for this kernel flaw was not backported to long-term Linux distributions in kernel 3.10.77.

However, researchers at Qualys Research Labs has now found that this vulnerability could be exploited to escalate privileges and it affects all major Linux distributions, including Red Hat, Debian, and CentOS.

...

Linux distributions, including Red Hat, Debian, and CentOS, have released security updates to address the vulnerability.

Sep 27 14:52

DHS To Officially Require Immigrants' Files To Contain Social Media Info

It looks like being the wrong kind of American will result in the mandatory collection of social media account handles and aliases. New rules on social media snooping have been floated several times with varying degrees of sincerity, but this time the DHS actually means it.

Sep 27 12:32

Brevity No Longer The Soul Of Twit: Twitter To Double Character Limit

Twitter has started testing a new feature that would double the number of characters users can fit in a single post, from 140 to 280. However, the proposed expanded limit would only apply to users who tweet in certain languages.

Sep 27 09:47

Slow Wi-fi? Hackers may have turned your gadgets into 'zombie' botnets that conduct criminal activities without you knowing

Researchers from Norton Security compiled data from parent firm Symantec and found 6.7 million more bots joined the global botnet in 2016.

Bots are internet connected devices infected with malware that allow hackers to remotely take control of many devices at a time.

Whether it’s computers, smartphones, security cameras or home routers, many consumers are generally unaware their device may have been corralled into a bot master’s control.

Combined, these devices form powerful networks, called botnets, which can be used to wreak havoc online.

Sep 27 09:46

Ransomware is the top threat facing computer users as Interpol reveals massive 2017 cybercrime 'epidemic'

Ransomware eclipsed most other forms of cybercrime as on-line crime surged in 2017, European policing agency Europol said on Wednesday, citing high-profile attacks such as 'WannaCry' that reached millions of computers.

Europol coordinated several successful cross-border operations against cybercriminals last year.

But national authorities urgently need to devote more resources to targeting the developers of hacking tools, the agency's head said.

Sep 27 09:22

Deloitte is a sitting duck: Key systems with RDP open, VPN and proxy 'login details leaked'

Monday’s news that multinational consultancy Deloitte had been hacked was dismissed by the firm as a small incident.

Now evidence suggests it's no surprise the biz was infiltrated: it appears to be all over the shop, security wise.

On Tuesday, what seemed to be a collection of Deloitte's corporate VPN passwords, user names, and operational details were found lurking within a public-facing GitHub-hosted repository. These have since been removed in the past hour or so. In addition, it appears that a Deloitte employee uploaded company proxy login credentials to his public Google+ page. The information was up there for over six months – and was removed in the past few minutes.

Sep 27 09:16

Cisco polishes the axe for more HQ job cuts

Cisco is saying farewell to 310 more staff from its corporate HQ in California, according to a filing with the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) system.

As part of its struggle to stay relevant in a world of cloud tech, the router and switch maker has spent the past seven years restructuring by removing people deemed to have the wrong skills and hiring new folk.

Back in May, Switchzilla confirmed its intent to chop 1,100 job worldwide, with 250 reductions earmarked for HQ in San Jose.

Sep 27 09:13

Google Researcher Publishes PoC Exploit for Apple iPhone Wi-Fi Chip Hack

You have now another good reason to update your iPhone to newly released iOS 11—a security vulnerability in iOS 10 and earlier now has a working exploit publicly available.

Gal Beniamini, a security researcher with Google Project Zero, has discovered a security vulnerability (CVE-2017-11120) in Apple's iPhone and other devices that use Broadcom Wi-Fi chips and is hell easy to exploit.

This flaw is similar to the one Beniamini discovered in the Broadcom WiFi SoC (Software-on-Chip) back in April, and BroadPwn vulnerability disclosed by an Exodus Intelligence researcher Nitay Artenstein, earlier this summer. All flaws allow a remote takeover of smartphones over local Wi-Fi networks.

The newly discovered vulnerability, which Apple fixed with its major iOS update released on September 19, could allow hackers to take control over the vi

Sep 27 08:08

Microsoft tries to stem its self-made collaboration-tool confusion

Microsoft is using this week's Ignite conference to try to help clarify its collaboration-tool strategy. Here's how SharePoint, Teams and Yammer figure in the mix.

Sep 27 08:07

Apple's first iOS 11 update: iPhone users get urgent fix for broken Microsoft email

Apple fixes an iOS 11 bug that stopped iPhone users sending email from Microsoft's email services.

Sep 27 07:33

‘Very troubling’: US asks China to hold off on cybersecurity law

Washington has asked Beijing to refrain from enforcing a new cybersecurity law that would require foreign and domestic companies to store user data in China and submit to security checks, saying such measures would damage global trade.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Interesting. The US Government is moving to have the people store their data in large corporate-owned cloud servers, but when it comes to China, prefers to keep US data under their own control.

Sep 26 16:58

Another Appeals Court Rules Warrants Required for “Stingray” Cellphone Surveillance

By Derrick Broze

An appeals court in Washington has ruled that law enforcement must acquire a search warrant before employing cell phone surveillance tools often known as “Stingrays.”

On September 21, an appeals court in Washington issued a damning ruling regarding law enforcement use of cell phone surveillance tools without the use of a warrant. The appeals court became the fourth court to rule against the unrestricted use of the controversial cell site simulators, sometimes known as “Stingrays.” The issue could eventually make its way to the Supreme Court. Stingray is the brand name of a popular cell-site simulator manufactured by the Harris Corporation.

Sep 26 15:31

FLASHBACK - Panama Papers Data Leak : King of Saudi Arabia sponsored Netanyahu’s campaign

According to the Middle East Observer, Isaac Herzog, member of the Knesset and Chairman of the Israeli Labor party, revealed that Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz financed the election campaign of Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu.

Sep 26 12:15

Fired Google Engineer Still Being Shamed, This Time By Netflix Executive

While the left is suddenly concerned with “freedom of expression” over KneeGatePaloozaGhazi, the right is quick to remind them, “Yeah, no you’re not.”

Sep 26 10:36

Are YOU having problems with iOS 11? Apple users complain the update drains their iPhone's battery and slows down apps

Some users claim that their phones 'just get stuck on apps' and that a hard reset is the only way to resolve the issue.

Apps including Reddit, Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook, Messenger, Safari, all appear to be affected.

For others the iOS update has drained their battery life - although there appears to be an explanation for this problem.

Wandera, a London-based mobile security company, found iPhones using iOS 11 took 96 minutes to empty their battery from 100 per cent charge.

Those on iOS 10 took longer, at 240 minutes.

Liana La Porta, head of content marketing at Wandera, conducted a study of 50,000 iPhones battery life.

The study found that battery drain may down to the iPhone's Spotlight app.

Sep 26 10:29

Man convicted of terror offence for refusing to give police phone and laptop password

The director of an advocacy group has been convicted of a terror offence after refusing to give police passwords to access his phone and laptop at Heathrow Airport.

Muhammad Rabbani vowed to appeal the first verdict of its kind after being handed a 12 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £620 in costs at Westminster Magistrates' Court.

The director of Cage was stopped under the Terrorism Act on 20 November last year after returning home from a wedding in Doha, Qatar.

Officers demanded access to his phone and laptop under wide-ranging powers granted by Schedule 7 of the law.

It allows police and immigration officials to stop, search, question and detain anyone at British ports and airports to determine whether they were involved in the “commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism” – with or without reasonable suspicion.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Like all the other erosions of our civil liberties this law will do nothing to stop real terrorists, who know not to use the internet for communications or to keep sensitive data on their phones and laptops.

The above hollowed-out coin can hold a micro SD card. Micro SD cards can hold huge amounts of data, topping out at 400 Gbytes; more than a third of a terabyte.

Real criminals and terrorists will use devices like this to protect their secrets, while law abiding citizens who simply desire their right to privacy are harassed and, as in this case, arrested.

Sep 26 10:15

Source: Deloitte Breach Affected All Company Email, Admin Accounts

Deloitte, one of the world’s “big four” accounting firms, has acknowledged a breach of its internal email systems, British news outlet The Guardian revealed today. Deloitte has sought to downplay the incident, saying it impacted “very few” clients. But according to a source close to the investigation, the breach dates back to at least the fall of 2016, and involves the compromise of all administrator accounts at the company as well as Deloitte’s entire internal email system.

Sep 26 09:44

SPYING BICYCLES LET POLICE KNOW WHO AND WHERE YOU ARE

Can you recall when your parents bought your first bicycle? Can you recall how thrilled you were when you didn’t need training wheels? Those were great memories right? Now imagine a future, where parents are forced to buy a bicycle that uploads all your kids data to a NASA spy satellite that knows exactly where they are are at all times.

Sep 26 09:36

First Android Malware Found Exploiting Dirty COW Linux Flaw to Gain Root Privileges

The malware uses the Dirty COW exploit to root Android devices via the copy-on-write (COW) mechanism in Android's Linux kernel and install a backdoor which can then be used by attackers to collect data and generate profit through a premium rate phone number.

Trend Micro researchers detected the ZNIU malware in more than 1,200 malicious Android apps—some of which disguised themselves as pornography and gaming apps—alongside host websites containing malware rootkits that exploit Dirty Cow.

While the Dirty Cow flaw impacts all versions of the Android operating system, the ZNIU's Dirty Cow exploit only affects Android devices with ARM/X86 64-bit architecture. However, the recent exploit can be used to bypass SELinux and plant backdoors.

Sep 26 09:35

Apple macOS High Sierra Exploit Lets Hackers Steal Keychain Passwords in Plaintext

Apple yesterday rolled out a new version of its macOS operating system, dubbed High Sierra 10.13—a few hours before an ex-NSA hacker publicly disclosed the details of a critical vulnerability that affects High Sierra as well as all earlier versions of macOS.

Patrick Wardle, an ex-NSA hacker and now head of research at security firm Synack, found a critical zero-day vulnerability in macOS that could allow any installed application to steal usernames and plaintext passwords of online accounts stored in the Mac Keychain.

Sep 26 09:33

Insteon and Wink home hubs appear to have a problem with encryption

Which is to say neither do it

Sep 26 09:30

CBS's Showtime caught mining crypto-coins in viewers' web browsers

The websites of US telly giant CBS's Showtime contained JavaScript that secretly commandeered viewers' web browsers over the weekend to mine cryptocurrency.

The flagship Showtime.com and its instant-access ShowtimeAnytime.com sibling silently pulled in code that caused browsers to blow spare processor time calculating new Monero coins – a privacy-focused alternative to the ever-popular Bitcoin. The hidden software typically consumed as much as 60 per cent of CPU capacity on computers visiting the sites.

Sep 26 09:28

Researchers promise demo of 'God-mode' pwnage of Intel mobos

Security researchers say they've found a way to exploit Intel's accident-prone Management Engine, and will reveal the problem at Black Hat Europe in December.

Positive Technologies researchers say the exploit “allows an attacker of the machine to run unsigned code in the Platform Controller Hub on any motherboard via Skylake+”.

Intel Management Engine (ME), a microcontroller that handles much of the communication between the processor and external devices, hit the headlines in May 2017 due to security concerns regarding the Active Management Technology (AMT) that runs on top of the engine.

It later emerged that AMT had a simple authentication error: an attacker could login with an empty password field.

For those whose vendors haven't pushed a firmware patch for AMT, in August Positive Technologies discovered how to switch off Management Engine.

Sep 26 09:24

The next must-have smartphone upgrades: Components you can swap yourself, and a conscience

Fairphone's second-generation handset, which was released in 2015, made a virtue of having components that could be easily swapped out by the device's owners, even if they had no technical skills to speak of. By making a device with simple-to-replace parts, Fairphone hoped it could extend the lifetime of its smartphones: rather than buy a whole device when the screen breaks, you just buy a new screen instead.

Sep 26 09:23

Equifax chief executive steps down after massive data breach

The former chief executive made over $4 million in salary last year.

Sep 25 09:30

Cheat sheet: How to become a cybersecurity pro

If you are interested in pursuing a career in cybersecurity and don't know where to start, here's your go-to guide to salaries, job markets, skills, and common interview questions in the field.

Sep 25 09:28

FACEBOOK TO MONITOR EVERYWHERE USERS HAVE BEEN FOR HIGHLY TARGETED ADS

Advertisers can now target Facebook users based on where they’ve been in the real world. The social network is allowing thousands of companies to serve ads specifically to people who have walked into their physical stores, in order to get them to come back.

Sep 25 05:54

Guess – go on, guess – where a vehicle tracking company left half a million records

A US outfit that sells vehicle tracking services has been accused of leaving more than half a million records in a leaky AWS S3 bucket.

The Kromtech Security Centre, which has made belling this particular cat its hobby, says it found a total of 540,642 ID numbers associated with SVR Tracking, an outfit that uses GPS devices to track vehicles so they can be found if their owners fall into arrears on payments.

Kromtech says data left lying around includes “logins / passwords, emails, VIN (vehicle identification number), IMEI numbers of GPS devices and other data that is collected on their devices, customers and auto dealerships”.

Sep 24 07:11

U.S. Government Announces 21 States Had Hackers Target Their System – Leaves Out DHS Hackers

By Aaron Kesel

The federal government just announced on Friday that election officials in 21 states had hackers target their systems before last year’s presidential election according to the Associated Press. But what about the DHS’s own attempted meddling in the election, getting caught red-handed running unauthorized scans for vulnerabilities in voter databases in more than five states...

Sep 23 19:17

Chrome Extension Embeds In-Browser Monero Miner That Drains Your CPU

The authors of SafeBrowse, a Chrome extension with more than 140,000 users, have embedded a JavaScript library in the extension's code that mines for the Monero cryptocurrency using users' computers and without getting their consent.

The additional code drives CPU usage through the roof, making users computers sluggish and hard to use.

Sep 23 15:36

Former Congressman Warns That Foreign Countries Could Bribe The Feds To “Regulate Drudge”

Consider this. As the establishment media continues to push their 24/7 anti-Trump echo chamber, real dangers poised by other countries are going unchecked, with many in the media most likely on board with the idea that top conservative news outlets need to be censored. At this point one can’t help but wonder (and worry) that some form of political censorship of the internet is on the horizon which will most likely be attempted by connecting the amazing success of someone like Matt Drudge to supposed Russian propaganda operations – all in the name of censoring non leftist voices.

Sep 23 10:36

GCHQ Warns of Massive Looming Cyberattack That Will Demand ‘National Response’

UK intelligence agency GCHQ’s National Cyber Security Center has warned the UK will fall victim to a major “preventable” cyberattack, even more severe than the WannaCry strike.

GCHQ’s National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) has warned the UK should be prepared for a major “category one” cyberattack — a major escalation from May’s WannaCry ransomware assault, that hit government servers severely.

The NCSC is aware of connections from multiple UK IP addresses to infrastructure associated with advanced state-sponsored hostile threat actors, who are known to target the energy and manufacturing sectors.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Lemme guess; the hackers are from Iran, Russia, and North Korea.

Sep 22 15:32

Dear Apple, The iPhone X and Face ID are Orwellian and Creepy

For the company that famously used 1984 in its advertising to usher in a new era of personal computing, it is pretty ironic that 30+ years later they would announce technology that has the potential to eliminate global privacy.

Sep 22 15:16

NBD: Adobe just dumped its PRIVATE PGP key on the internet

It goes without saying that the disclosure of a private security key would, to put it mildly, ruin a few employees' Friday. Armed with the private key, an attacker could spoof PGP-signed messages as coming from Adobe. Additionally, someone (cough, cough the NSA) with the ability to intercept emails – such as those detailing exploitable Flash security vulnerability reports intended for Adobe's eyes only – could use the exposed key to decrypt messages that could contain things like, say, zero-day vulnerability disclosures.

Armed with that info, miscreants could exploit that information to infect victims with malware before Adobe had even considered deploying a patch.

Sep 22 12:49

Court rules Stingray use without a warrant violates Fourth Amendment

Today, the Washington DC Court of Appeals overturned a Superior Court conviction of a man who was located by police using a cell-site simulator, or Stingray, CBS News reports. The court ruled that the defendant's Fourth Amendment rights were violated when law enforcement tracked down the suspect using his own cell phone without a warrant.

Stingrays work by pretending to be a cell tower and once they're brought close enough to a particular phone, that phone pings a signal off of them. The Stingray then grabs onto that signal and allows whoever's using it to locate the phone in question. These sorts of devices are used by a number of different agencies including the FBI, ICE, the IRS as well as police officers.

Sep 22 09:05

One Simple Chart Proves That Facebook Thinks You're A Moron

The chart below demonstrates how the $50,000 worth of ad buys that 'MAY' have been purchased by Russian-linked accounts to run 'potentially politically related' ads compares to the $26.8 billion in ad revenue that Facebook generated in the U.S. over the same time period between 3Q 2015 and 2Q 2017....If $50,000 can swing an entire presidential election can you imagine what $26.8 billion can do?

Sep 22 08:55

Important Details About Situation With SouthFront’s YouTube Channel

Summing up the described events, it becomes clear that SouthFront has faced a preplanned illegal campaign launched by some persons from the YouTube internal team.

SouthFront is waiting results of the investigation of this case by the YouTube staff. We want to know who was responsible for re-uploading/restoration of the video “Foreign Policy Diary ‘War on Terror’ [remastered]”. How was the video restored?

This series of hostile and disingenuous actions, as well as prejudicial treatment of some members of the YouTube staff against SouthFront poses a real threat that SouthFront’s YouTube channel might soon be closed down or frozen. In this case, SouthFront informs that you can watch all SouthFront videos at the project’s website, http://southfront.org

Sep 22 08:43

Jailbreaking your connected coffee machine: The idiocy of things

Pretty much all these things -- with the exception of the Amazon Echo, which uses AWS for virtually everything -- can act as regular dumb devices that can be operated manually in the event they lose connectivity.

But, increasingly, I am starting to see smart devices that not only rely on connectivity for basic functionality but use networking and sensors in order to prevent end-users from actually getting the most out of their devices.

Specifically, I am talking about smart appliances that depend on refillable supplies. In information technology, the most notable offender is Hewlett-Packard small/home office printers, which not only use proprietary ink and toner cartridges that are specific to each model but employ validation technology to determine that the refills are in fact genuine OEM parts, and it will disable third-party cartridges if detected.

Sep 22 06:14

Harvard Study Proves Apple Slows Down old iPhones to Sell Millions of New Models

People have made the anecdotal observation that their Apple products become much slower right before the release of a new model.

Now, a Harvard University study has done what any person with Google Trends could do, and pointed out that Google searches for “iPhone slow” spiked multiple times, just before the release of a new iPhone each time.

The study was performed by student Laura Trucco. The study also compared the results to “Samsung Galaxy slow,” and found that the same spike in searches did not occur before the release of a new Samsung phone.

Sep 22 06:06

The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

Two other big brands, Sky and BT, also in the naughty corner

Sep 21 18:25

Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

Kiss your Microsoft email goodbye, for now, if you update

Sep 21 18:20

ISPs May Be Helping Hackers to Infect you with FinFisher Spyware

When the target users search for one of the affected applications on legitimate websites and click on its download link, their browser is served a modified URL, which redirects victims to a trojanized installation package hosted on the attacker's server.

This results in the installation of a version of the intended legitimate application bundled with the surveillance tool.

"The redirection is achieved by the legitimate download link being replaced by a malicious one," the researchers say. "The malicious link is delivered to the user’s browser via an HTTP 307 Temporary Redirect status response code indicating that the requested content has been temporarily moved to a new URL."

This whole redirection process, according to researchers, is "invisible to the naked eye" and occurs without user's knowledge.

Sep 21 17:29

Stock Markets HACKED!

Sep 21 13:50

Computers Rule The Earth

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WRH Exclusive
Sep 21 10:28

Apple concedes new watch has connectivity glitch

Apple Inc on Wednesday conceded its latest smartwatch unveiled a week ago has problems with its most important feature: the ability to make phone calls and access data without an iPhone nearby.

Several prominent reviewers said Wednesday they could not recommend the device because of a wifi glitch that causes cellular connectivity problems.

Sep 21 10:24

Apple has confirmed that Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are not fully disabled when toggled off in Control Center on iOS 11.

Even when toggled off in Control Center on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 11 and later, a new support document says Bluetooth and Wi-Fi will continue to be available for AirDrop, AirPlay, Apple Pencil, Apple Watch, Location Services, and Continuity features like Handoff and Instant Hotspot.

Toggling off Bluetooth or Wi-Fi in Control Center only disconnects accessories now, rather than disabling connectivity entirely.

...

iOS 11 users can still completely disable Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for all networks and devices by toggling them off in the Settings app.

Sep 21 10:05

Are you being watched? FinFisher government spy tool found hiding as WhatsApp and Skype

Legitimate downloads of popular software including WhatsApp, Skype and VLC Player have allegedly being hacked at an internet service provider (ISP) level to spread an dvanced form of surveillance software known as "FinFisher", cybersecurity researchers warn.

FinFisher is sold to global governments and intelligence agencies and can be used to snoop on webcam feeds, keystrokes, microphones and web browsing. Documents, previously published by WikiLeaks, indicate that one tool called "FinFly ISP" may be linked to case.

...

This week (21 September), experts from cybersecurity firm Eset claimed that new FinFisher variants had been discovered in seven countries, two of which were being targeted by "man in the middle" (MitM) attacks at an ISP level – packaging real downloads with spyware.

Companies being hit included WhatsApp, Skype, Avast, VLC Player and WinRAR, it said, adding that "virtually any application could be misused in this way."

Sep 21 09:54

Why didn’t Equifax protect your data? Because corporations have all the power.

The hack revealed how little control consumers have these days.

Sep 21 09:52

More data lost or stolen in first half of 2017 than the whole of last year

More data records were leaked or stolen by miscreants during the first half of 2017 (1.9 billion) than all of 2016 (1.37 billion).

Digital security company Gemalto's Breach Level Index (PDF), published Wednesday, found that an average of 10.4 million records are exposed or swiped every day.

During the first half of 2017 there were 918 reported data breaches worldwide, compared with 815 in the last six months of 2016, an increase of 13 per cent. A total 22 breaches in Q1 2017 included the compromise, theft or loss of more than a million records.

Gemalto estimates less than 1 per cent of the stolen, lost or compromised data used encryption to render the information useless.

Sep 21 09:49

FedEx: TNT NotPetya infection blew a $300m hole in our numbers

FedEx has estimated this year's NotPetya ransomware outbreak cost it $300m in lost business and cleanup costs.

Sep 21 09:47

CCleaner targeted top tech companies in attempt to lift IP

Cisco's security limb Talos has probed the malware-laden CCleaner utility that Avast so kindly gave to the world and has concluded its purpose was to create secondary attacks that attempted to penetrate top technology companies. Talos also thinks the malware may have succeeded in delivering a payload to some of those firms targeted.

The malware that made its way into CCleaner gathers information about its host and sends it to what Talos calls the "C2 server". Whoever is behind the malware then reviews the hosts its code has compromised. It then tries to infect some of those hosts with what Talos characterises as "specialized secondary payloads".

Those payloads sometimes seek out top tech companies: Talos said its examination of code on the C2 server lists targets including Cisco, Microsoft, Sony, Intel, VMware, Samsung, D-Link, Epson, MSI, Linksys, Singtel and the dvrdns.org domain, which resolves to dyn.org.

Sep 21 09:45

You lost your ballpoint pen, Slack? Why's your Linux version unsigned?

Slack is distributing open Linux-based versions of its technology that are not digitally signed, contrary to industry best practice.

The absence of a digital signature creates a means for miscreants to sling around doctored versions of the software that users wouldn't easily be able to distinguish from the real thing.

El Reg learned of the issue from reader Trevor Hemsley, who reported the problem to Slack back in August and only notified the media after a promised fix failed to appear.

"Slack distribute Linux packages for their app and those packages come from a yum repository that does not have a GPG key and the packages are not signed," Hemsley explained.

Sep 21 09:21

Viacom Left Sensitive Data And Secret Access Key On Unsecured Amazon Server

A security researcher working for California-based cyber resiliency firm UpGuard has recently discovered a wide-open, public-facing misconfigured Amazon Web Server S3 cloud storage bucket containing roughly a gigabyte's worth of credentials and configuration files for the backend of dozens of Viacom properties.

These exposed credentials discovered by UpGuard researcher Chris Vickery would have been enough for hackers to take down Viacom's internal IT infrastructure and internet presence, allowing them to access cloud servers belonging to MTV, Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon.

Among the data exposed in the leak was Viacom's master key to its Amazon Web Services account, and the credentials required to build and maintain Viacom servers across its many subsidiaries and dozens of brands.

Sep 21 08:38

The biggest computer leak in history

Political data gathered on more than 198 million US citizens was exposed this month after a marketing firm contracted by the Republican National Committee stored internal documents on a publicly accessible Amazon server.

The data leak contains a wealth of personal information on roughly 61 percent of the US population. Along with home addresses, birthdates, and phone numbers, the records include advanced sentiment analyses used by political groups to predict where individual voters fall on hot-button issues such as gun ownership, stem cell research, and the right to abortion, as well as suspected religious affiliation and ethnicity. The data was amassed from a variety of sources—from the banned subreddit r/fatpeoplehate to American Crossroads, the super PAC co-founded by former White House strategist Karl Rove.

Sep 21 05:47

Government Sues Citizens for Requesting Information - #NewWorldNextWeek - corbettreport

Published on Sep 21, 2017Welcome to New World Next Week - the video series from Corbett Report and Media Monarchy that covers some of the most important developments in open source intelligence news. This week:

Story #1: Agencies Suing Citizens, Journalists Who Seek Public Records
http://bit.ly/2yf3BQ7

Entire Volume of CIA Files On Lee Harvey Oswald, Set to Be Released in October, Has ‘Gone Missing’
http://bit.ly/2fju1wx

The CIA Preps Their Next JFK Psyop
http://bit.ly/2yr6nmz

Story #2: PM May Warns Tech Firms Over Terror Content
http://bit.ly/2jMe9Eh

Facebook, Google Are ‘Surveillance States’ That Risk Regulation
http://bit.ly/2fbHBy9

Trump, Netanyahu Ready United Assault Against Iran Nuclear Deal
http://bit.ly/2wz57QR

Netanyahu Hails Trump’s ‘Courageous’ UN Speech Blasting Iran
http://bit.ly/2xor3Nx

Netanyahu: Trump Is Changing the World by Supporting Israel
http://bit.ly/2yqHCXq

Sep 20 17:17

England’s second biggest police force STILL runs Windows XP leaving it vulnerable to a Wannacry-type attack

Following a Freedom of Information request, England's second largest police force told the BBC that 1,518 of its computers – representing 20.3 per cent of all devices - ran on Window XP.

This is despite the fact that Microsoft no longer provides support for the operating system, leaving it vulnerable to hackers.

Speaking to the BBC, Dr Steven Murdoch, a cyber-security expert at University College London, said: 'Even if security vulnerabilities are identified in XP, Microsoft won't distribute patches in the same way it does for later releases of Windows.

Sep 20 15:52

For weeks, Equifax customer service has been directing victims to a fake phishing site

Earlier this month, hackers broke into Equifax's servers and stole 143 million people's personal information, including their Social Security numbers. In response to the attack, Equifax set up a website — www.equifaxsecurity2017.com — for possible victims to verify whether they're affected. Because the process involves sharing sensitive information, consumers have to trust they're entering their data in the right place, which can be tricky because the breach-recovery site itself isn’t part of equifax.com. If users end up on the wrong site, they could end up leaking the data they're already concerned was stolen.

Sep 20 11:40

UK Supermarket Becomes World’s First to Offer Cashless Checkout with Finger Vein Scan

By Nicholas West

The march toward a cashless society has now moved from the theoretical to the phase of widespread adoption. This is primarily due to developments in the tech sector that now enable the easy use of biometric recognition systems, as well as the increasing acceptance from a public who is becoming familiar with turning themselves into a password for their personal devices...

Sep 20 10:56

The War On Social Media Is Being Stepped Up

A really social media, one where we can freely express ourselves and where we alone control the content, is the problem. It must be stopped at all costs.

First, it was “fake news”: the suggestion that social media is uniquely damaging to democracy, rather than the corporately owned media that feeds us constant lies, including the egregious deception that WMD existed in Iraq, and selects self-serving political priorities, such as that Russia’s Vladimir Putin is the biggest threat to the planet’s safety (Donald Trump and climate breakdown are far bigger threats right now).

Sep 20 08:29

WAR BEX - Suspected Iranian Hackers Targeted U.S. Aerospace Sector

This time the hackers were only conducting espionage, via job-recruiting links. But researchers worry the group dubbed APT33 has a capability to launch more destructive attacks.

Sep 20 07:37

Alternative Social Network Gab Faces Domain Seizure For Violating “Anti-Discrimination Laws”

By Aaron Kesel

Alternative media social network Gab.ai, whose logo is a frog often used by the "alt right," faces domain seizure for failing to remove content that vilifies "race, religion or ethnic origin." Their registrar further implied that the site promotes hate and discrimination.

Gab’s domain registrar, Asia Registry, has given the network 5 days to transfer its domain or it will be seized according to a notice sent to the company, Andrew Torbha Gab’s CEO tweeted out...

Sep 20 07:12

Itching to stuff iOS 11 on your iPhone? You may want to hold off for a bit

Apps are gonna break. Plus of course, Apple always screws up the first iteration

Sep 20 07:05

Equifax's disastrous Struts patching blunder: THOUSANDS of other orgs did it too

The Equifax breach was the result of a vulnerable Apache Struts component. Software automation vendor Sonatype warns that 3,054 organisations downloaded the same Struts2 component exploited in the Equifax hack in the last 12 months. The affected version of Struts2 was publicly disclosed as vulnerable (CVE-2017-5638) on March 10, and was subsequently exploited at Equifax between May and late July, when the attack was finally detected.

Additionally, more than 46,000 organisations downloaded versions of Struts and/or its sub-projects with known vulnerabilities despite perfectly safe versions being available. Altogether, upwards of 50,000 organisations might be vulnerable to attack.

Sep 19 14:36

The Google Apocalypse Looms

I’ve written about the dangers of monopolies within the drug and agricultural industries on numerous occasions, but Google is perhaps one of the greatest monopolies that ever existed on the planet. The reason why I’ve decided to address Google here is because the technology giant is injecting itself ever deeper into our day-to-day lives, from childhood education to patented meat substitutes1,2 and health care, and with its internet monopoly and personal information tracking and sharing.

Sep 19 10:00

More Equifax Lies? Company Originally Hacked Five Months Earlier Than It Disclosed

Equifax Inc. learned about a major breach of its computer systems in March -- almost five months before the date it has publicly disclosed, according to three people familiar with the situation

Sep 19 10:00

Why Is Google Hiring 1,000 Journalists To Flood Newsrooms Around America?

So what do you do when you fail to elect your chosen candidate and your former political allies and mainstream media turn against you by painting you not as the 'progressive', open-minded, friendly tech company that you used to be but as an evil, racist, Russian-colluding corporate villain intent upon destroying all that is sacred in the world? Well, you just buy the media, of course.

As Poynter notes today, after a series of public relations debacles in recent weeks, from the firing of James Damore to news last week that Google's algos served up some fairly disturbing keywords to potential advertising buyers (e.g. "Why Do Black People Ruin Neighborhoods"), Google is ramping up its media presence with the announcement that the Google News Lab will be working with Report For America (RFA) to hire 1,000 journalists all around the country.

Sep 19 08:46

First they came for the Nazis and pedophiles…

I have to begin this analysis by asking for your understanding for the fact that it will include a lot of full-length quotes. Under normal circumstances, I would have simply provided links, but considering the topic I will be discussing, and how some things suddenly “disappear” on the Internet, full-length quotes is probably the best option. The topic I want to deal with is the brutal crackdown on free speech by the AngloZionist Empire by means of its ‘loyal corporations’.

Sep 19 08:38

iOS 11 release date is tomorrow. Here's how to get your iPhone or iPad ready

SHOULD I WAIT A WHILE BEFORE DOING THE UPGRADE?

There will likely be an update or two to iOS 11 coming down the pipes over the coming weeks, so you might want to wait for the dust to settle and for any last-minute bugs to be squashed before making the leap, especially if you rely on your device.

Sep 19 08:36

Double trouble: This ransomware campaign could infect your PC with two types of file-locking malware

Victims around the world hit by criminals who can switch the malicious payload of emails between Locky and FakeGlobal on a whim.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Cybercrime is out of control, and is a clear and present danger to the nation's economy .... and the government can't do a thing about it because the cyber criminals are using the exploits mandated into our systems by the NSA and CIA.

Sep 19 08:31

Equifax aftermath: How to protect against identity theft

Who here is scrambling around in the aftermath of the recent breach at Equifax to figure out if you’ve been compromised? Who here is wondering what to do about it if you are? If you’re one of the 143 million Americans whose data was accessed by cybercriminals, then you probably raised your hand.

Even if you weren’t one of the 143 million, you might still want to take some precautions. You could instead be part of the millions of folks who’ve had their data stolen over the course of online history. Basically, if you have a social security number, have ever run a credit check, or have a pulse, you should listen up. Why? Two words: identity theft.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I had my identity stolen. They sent it back when they saw how much it sucks to be me!

Sep 19 07:42

HP pushes third-party ink blocking printer firmware update (again)

Hewlett Packard (HP) released a new firmware for the company's Officejet printers that appears to block third-party ink from functioning correctly.

The company caused quite the uproar a year ago when it released a firmware for some of its printer families that blocked non-HP cartridges in company printers. HP released a firmware update a month later back then that restored functionality for non-HP printer ink.

The new firmware update that was released on September 13th, 2017 looks like an exact copy of the firmware update released a year ago (on the same day even).

Sep 19 07:38

Microsoft's AI is so good it steered Renault into bottom of the F1 league

Microsoft on Sunday bragged its artificial intelligence technology is behind the, er, success of a massively underperforming Renault Formula One team.

In a poorly timed bit of marketing, the Redmond software giant talked up its partnership with the racing team just as the latter finds itself sitting 433 points behind leader Mercedes.

Microsoft says the Renault team – running 7th out of 10 in the 2017 Formula One Constructor Standings – uses everything from Azure Machine Learning, to Stream Analytics, to Dynamics 365, to help it not win.

Sep 19 07:35

Google's data hoarding is like homeopathy. It doesn't work – study

Boffins find search quality unaffected no matter how much information web giant amasses

Sep 19 07:33

Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP

Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update.

Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes.

The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay.

Sep 18 16:10

Equifax Suffered a Hack Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed

Equifax Inc. learned about a major breach of its computer systems in March -- almost five months before the date it has publicly disclosed, according to three people familiar with the situation.

In a statement, the company said the March breach was not related to the hack that exposed the personal and financial data on 143 million U.S. consumers, but one of the people said the breaches involve the same intruders.

Sep 18 14:38

Pepe the Frog Creator Sends DMCA Take Down to Reddit

... Wants The_Donald to Police Pepe Use... SAD!

Sep 18 12:51

Exclusive: Facebook Silences Rohingya Reports of Ethnic Cleansing

The social network says it’s committed to helping the world ‘share their stories.’ But when people from Burma’s oppressed minority post, their stories have a habit of disappearing.

Sep 18 11:49

GOOGLE, TECH GIANTS THREATEN TO SHUT DOWN ‘FREE SPEECH’ SOCIAL SITE

Search engine giant Google and other tech platforms have threatened to shut down free-speech social media site Gab in the name of fighting “hate speech.”

Gab, a social media platform known as a free speech oasis, was just recently ordered to transfer their Australian domain elsewhere or face shutdown.

“Gab’s domain registrar has given us 5 days to transfer our domain or they will seize it. The free and open web is in danger,” the website tweeted.

Sep 18 10:59

John McAfee accidentally just revealed why Bitcoin is a total fraud: Behold the logic of “artificial work”

However, sir… you called Bitcoin ‘a fraud.’ I’m a Bitcoin miner. We create Bitcoins. It costs over one thousand dollars per coin to create a Bitcoin. What does it cost to create a U.S. dollar? Which one is the fraud? Because [the dollar] costs whatever the paper costs, but it costs me and other miners over a thousand dollars per coin – it’s called ‘proof of work.’

Sep 18 09:43

Vevo Music Video Service Hacked — 3.12TB of Internal Data Leaked

Although it's not clear what prompted OurMine to hack Vevo, the group noted on its website that it initially tried to alert Vevo of the breach privately, but when one of the Vevo's employees responded, "F*** off, you don't have anything," it went public with the data breach and leaked Vevo files.

According to Variety, the stolen files included notes on around 90 artists, including Britney Spears, Jennifer Lopez, Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Madonna, Calvin Harris, Ariana Grande, Florida Georgia Line, One Direction, Sia, The Weeknd, and U2.

Sep 18 09:41

Unpatched Windows Kernel Bug Could Help Malware Hinder Detection

A 17-year-old programming error has been discovered in Microsoft's Windows kernel that could prevent some security software from detecting malware at runtime when loaded into system memory.

The security issue, described by enSilo security researcher Omri Misgav, resides in the kernel routine "PsSetLoadImageNotifyRoutine," which apparently impacts all versions of Windows operating systems since Windows 2000.

...

What's bad? It seems like Microsoft has no plans to address this issue, as the software giant does not consider it as a security vulnerability.

Sep 18 09:39

Warning: CCleaner Hacked to Distribute Malware; Over 2.3 Million Users Infected

If you have downloaded or updated CCleaner application on your computer between August 15 and September 12 of this year from its official website, then pay attention—your computer has been compromised.

...

Detected on 13 September, the malicious version of CCleaner contains a multi-stage malware payload that steals data from infected computers and sends it to attacker's remote command-and-control servers.

Sep 17 16:51

Aug 30 Flashback: Tim Cook Sure Is Selling Stock at a Weird Time

Stock-market investors are over the moon about the prospects for Apple's next iPhone. But the company's top executive isn't sending the most bullish signal.

Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook in recent days sold about $43 million worth of company stock, according to a regulatory filing, reflecting a sale of all the net shares he was awarded last week for his job performance.

It's a nice time for Cook to get handed a big batch of Apple stock. Shares hit an all-time high on Tuesday and have climbed 41 percent so far this year. But it might not be the greatest time to sell Apple shares, if you believe the company is on the cusp of (further) greatness.

Apple CEO Tim Cook recently sold all the net shares from his annual stock award; it's only the second time in five years that he's done so.

Sep 17 12:11

This Hilarious Retweet From President Trump Has Liberals Completely Freaking Out

If there’s one thing we know about President Donald Trump it’s that he is probably the most transparent President in history insofar as sharing his personal views is concerned. If he’s thinking it, then there’s often a chance that the rest of the country will soon know about it via his social media sites. Of course, his off-the-cuff remarks are often a bit too controversial for his detractors to handle, and a recent Retweet of a meme he happened across online and shared with his 38.5 million followers is no exception:

Sep 17 09:04

This Is What Your Identity Sells For On The Dark Web

It is now easier – and cheaper – for criminals to access and abuse illicit data than ever before. In fact, a high-limit American express card with a high chance of working can be purchased online for less than $20. Criminals can buy files with thousands of low-limit card numbers for pennies on the dollar.

Sep 17 09:01

14 Cutting Edge Tech Firms Funded By The CIA

The CIA has its own investment capital firm called “In-Q-Tel,” and it’s been funding innovative tech firms for years. This is both good news and bad. One the one hand, it allows the CIA to invest in technologies they deem useful for the intelligence community; however, some of these technologies are a little creepy when it comes to personal space and privacy. In-Q-Tel has the ability to reach deep into the pockets of the U.S. government’s Black Budget, which is pretty hefty given that the Washington Post reported that a staggering $52.6 billion was set aside for Black Budget operations in fiscal year 2013. If you’re unfamiliar with the Black Budget program, that’s not very surprising; the entire point of the program is to keep these funds and the programs within it top secret.

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