CBS:Vaccine Injured Veterans Denied Benefits | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

CBS:Vaccine Injured Veterans Denied Benefits

We just wrote a story about service men who were forced to get an anthrax vaccine (some refused and were court-martialed) because they were worried about the side effects. Well, servicemen and women are still being forced to take vaccines and live with the side effects, only now, they are also being denied benefits if the vaccines cause permanent damage. Please watch the video below and forward it to everyone you know.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This absolutely bites, and is an officially horrible stance by the US government and its military.

This smallpox vaccine has a known side effect of periocarditis, or myocarditis, and this has been documented by the CDC itself:

Cardiac Adverse Events Following Smallpox Vaccination --- United States, 2003

This has been known since 2003, for heaven's sake; so why has the US military continually have given been giving this vaccine to our men and women in uniform since that time, when the known dangers were very clear at that point?!?

The short, and rather cynical, but true answer, is to make its manufacturer, Sanofi Pasteur Biologics Company, richer.

And the other, interesting factor to consider?!?

This vaccine uses a live virus, and I have to wonder if this is the link to episodes of myocarditis and periocarditis in those vaccinated.

As reported at the FDA site about this vaccine:

How does ACAM2000 work? The vaccine is made from a virus called vaccinia, which is a "pox"-type virus related to smallpox but causes milder disease. ACAM2000 cannot cause smallpox; it does not contain the smallpox virus, but rather the "live" vaccinia virus - not dead virus like many other vaccines. For this reason, attentively caring for the vaccination site is important to prevent the virus from spreading from the vaccination site to other parts of the body, or to other people. ACAM2000 is administered differently than the typical "shot" associated with most vaccinations. A two-pronged stainless steel (or bifurcated) needle is dipped into the vaccine solution and the skin is pricked several times in the upper arm with a droplet of the vaccine. The virus begins growing at the injection site causing a localized infection or "pock" to form. A red, itchy sore spot at the site of the vaccination within 3-4 days is an indicator that the vaccination was successful; that is, there is "a take." A blister develops at the vaccination site and then dries up forming a scab that falls off in the third week, leaving a small scar.

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