FIRST VACCINATED VERSUS NONVACCINATED PEER REVIEW STUDY PUBLISHED | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

FIRST VACCINATED VERSUS NONVACCINATED PEER REVIEW STUDY PUBLISHED

Finally, it’s happened; the first vaccinated versus nonvaccinated children’s health peer review study has been published in the Journal of Translational Science [1]. The study titled “Pilot comparative study on the health of vaccinated and unvaccinated 6- to 12- year old U.S. children” is published as an open access text, thankfully, which everyone—bar none—should read, especially if you are a parent or grandparent.

With 71 References and nine charts, it clearly represents documented proof of what the authors were able to ascertain, when in the Conclusions they state:

Assessment of the long-term effects of the vaccination schedule on morbidity and mortality has been limited [71]. In this pilot study of vaccinated and unvaccinated homeschool children, reduced odds of chickenpox and whooping cough were found among the vaccinated, as expected, but unexpectedly increased odds were found for many other physician-diagnosed conditions. Although the cross-sectional design of the study limits causal interpretation, the strength and consistency of the findings, the apparent “dose-response” relationship between vaccination status and several forms of chronic illness, and the significant association between vaccination and NDDs [Neurodevelopmental disorders] all support the possibility that some aspect of the current vaccination program could be contributing to risks of childhood morbidity.

Vaccination also remained significantly associated with NDD after controlling for other factors, whereas preterm birth, long considered a major risk factor for NDD, was not associated with NDD after controlling for the interaction between preterm birth and vaccination. In addition, preterm birth coupled with vaccination was associated with an apparent synergistic increase in the odds of NDD above that of vaccination alone. Nevertheless, the study findings should be interpreted with caution. First, additional research is needed to replicate the findings in studies with larger samples and stronger research designs. Second, subject to replication, potentially detrimental factors associated with the vaccination schedule should be identified and addressed and underlying mechanisms better understood. Such studies are essential in order to optimize the impact of vaccination of children’s health. [1]

Webmaster's Commentary: 

So, bada BOOM, there you have it!!

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