US Says ‘Yes’ to Nuke Tests, ‘No’ to a Nuke Ban Treaty | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

US Says ‘Yes’ to Nuke Tests, ‘No’ to a Nuke Ban Treaty

Twice in seven days the United States shot nuclear-capable long-range missiles toward the Marshall Islands, but the same government refused in March to join negotiations for a new treaty banning nuclear weapons.

In late March, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley explained why the US would boycott the "treaty ban" negotiations that began March 27 at the UN in New York City. Haley said about nuclear weapons, "[W]e can’t honestly say that we can protect our people by allowing the bad actors to have them, and those of us that are good, trying to keep peace and safety not to have them." North Korean president Kim Jong-un could have said the same thing about his seven nuclear warheads, especially in view of US bombs and missiles currently falling on seven countries – Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya – and engagement in massive war games off the Korean peninsula.

US military: "We are prepared to use nuclear weapons"

As it did Feb. 21 and Feb. 25, 2016, the Air Force regularly tests Minuteman-3s. Deputy Pentagon Chief Robert Work explained before the Feb. 25 launch that the US had tested "at least" 15 since January 2011, "And that is a signal … that we are prepared to use nuclear weapons in defense of our country if necessary."

This is a Big Lie. To "use" nuclear weapons produces only massacres, and massacres are never defensive.

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