TOM ENGELHARDT: AMERICA’S GLOBALIZATION OF MISERY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

TOM ENGELHARDT: AMERICA’S GLOBALIZATION OF MISERY

On the initial day of the offensive to recapture the city, the Pentagon was already congratulating the Iraqi military for being “ahead of schedule” in a campaign that was expected to “take weeks or even months.” Little did its planners — who had been announcing its prospective start for nearly a year — know. A week later, everything was still “proceeding according to our plan,” claimed then-U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter. By the end of January 2017, after 100 days of fierce fighting, the eastern part of that city, divided by the Tigris River, was more or less back in government hands and it had, according to New York Times reporters on the scene, been “spared the wholesale destruction inflicted on other Iraqi cities” like Ramadi and Fallujah, even though those residents who hadn’t fled were reportedly “scratching out a primitive existence, deprived of electricity, running water and other essential city services.”

And that was the good news. More than 100 days later, Iraqi troops continue to edge their way through embattled western Mosul, with parts of it, including the treacherous warren of streets in its Old City, still in the hands of ISIS militants amid continuing bitter building-to-building fighting. The Iraqi government and its generals still insist, however, that everything will be over in mere weeks. An estimated thousand or so ISIS defenders (of the original 4,000-8,000 reportedly entrenched in the city) are still holding out and will assumedly fight to the death. U.S. air power has repeatedly been called in big time, with civilian deaths soaring, and hundreds of thousands of its increasingly desperate and hungry inhabitants still living in battle-scarred Mosul as Islamic State fighters employ countless bomb-laden suicide vehicles and even small drones.

After seven months of unending battle in that single city, perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that Mosul has receded from the news here, even as civilian casualties grow, at least half a million Iraqis have been displaced, and the Iraqi military has suffered grievous losses.

Though there’s been remarkably little writing about it, here’s what now seems obvious: when the fighting is finally over and the Islamic State defeated, the losses will be so much more widespread than that. Despite initial claims that the Iraqi military (and the U.S. Air Force) were taking great care to avoid as much destruction as possible in an urban landscape filled with civilians, the rules of engagement have since changed and it’s clear that, in the end, significant swathes of Iraq’s second largest city will be left in ruins. In this, it will resemble so many other cities and towns in Iraq and Syria, from Fallujah to Ramadi, Homs to Aleppo.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Those in the bowels of power in the Unhinged States of America call this "victory"; and in the parlance of the verbal war-porn of the Vietnam war, the Iraqi and US forces have "destroyed the city in order to save it."

But the alleged "victory, is not for the Iraqi people; it is for the American deep state, which has managed to insure that the government in Baghdad is still nominally Western-centric, and that the oil coming from this country is only sold in US dollars.

The genocide of innocent men, women, and children, by bullets, starvation, or maiming to death of these individuals does not matter to the deep American state, or the financial people; this is all about the oil, and all about the money, no matter the human cost here.

There is a rhythm and an energy here, and once you see the pattern, it becomes quite obvious; invade; destroy; regime change; make sure resources are only sold in US dollars, and repeat.

This is the essence of current American foreign policy, all wrapped up in a pretty, cheap, American flag, until and unless it is stopped, before the planet is vaporized in a nuclear holocaust.

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