After detecting life on Mars in 1976 and sweeping it under the rug, NASA banned life-detection experiments to hide the truth from the world | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

After detecting life on Mars in 1976 and sweeping it under the rug, NASA banned life-detection experiments to hide the truth from the world

Now, the former NASA engineer who designed the experiment that confirmed the presence of life on Mars is speaking out. His name is Gilbert V. Levin, and in a new op-ed published in Scientific American, he lays out his belief that life was already confirmed on Mars in the 1970s.

“I was fortunate to have participated in that historic adventure as experimenter of the Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment on NASA’s spectacular Viking mission to Mars in 1976,” writes Levin. “On July 30, 1976, the LR returned its initial results from Mars. Amazingly, they were positive. As the experiment progressed, a total of four positive results, supported by five varied controls, streamed down from the twin Viking spacecraft landed some 4,000 miles apart. The data curves signaled the detection of microbial respiration on the Red Planet. The curves from Mars were similar to those produced by LR tests of soils on Earth.”

As word of the discovery spread, many other scientists around the world began to rejoice. Levin even received a personal phone call from Carl Sagan, congratulating him on the discovery.

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