Pentagon in Denial About Civilian Casualties of U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq and Syria | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Pentagon in Denial About Civilian Casualties of U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq and Syria

The Pentagon accepts that with many hundreds of allied bombings aimed at Islamic State targets since August, there is a “continued risk inherent in these strikes” for civilians on the ground. But that doesn’t mean the United States will offer compensation if it kills them.

The United States is not planning to grant compensation for civilians killed in airstrikes in Iraq and Syria, Foreign Policy has learned, despite claims by credible groups that at least 100 noncombatants may already have died in the 16 weeks of U.S.-led bombings.

The decision, confirmed by a senior spokesman for U.S. Central Command (Centcom), the military command organization in charge of the air war, marks a significant departure from recent conflicts, in which payments have regularly been made to those affected by U.S. military actions.

Washington also continues to insist it cannot confirm a single noncombatant death from more than 1,100 airstrikes against Islamic State targets — despite a number of apparently well-documented cases of error or collateral damage in both Iraq and Syria.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

"Hell, these people are just 'collateral damage'; they don't matter in the larger scheme of things, and the babies would have grown up to be terrorists we'd have had to kill anyway!!" - Official Pentagon Souse.

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