Study Reveals Sad Link Between Poverty And Children's Brain Development | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Study Reveals Sad Link Between Poverty And Children's Brain Development

We've long known that children from affluent families get a head start that can translate into a long-lasting advantage, especially when it comes to academic achievement. Now, scientists have found what may be part of the explanation: Children who grow up in higher-income families appear to have larger brains.

Researchers from nine universities across the country, led by neuroscientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Columbia University Medical Center, conducted a major new study of the effects of family income and parental education on child and adolescent brain development.

"We've known for a long time that kids from lower-income or disadvantaged families don't do as well in school and have more difficulties on standardized tests," Dr. Elizabeth Sowell, director of the Developmental Cognitive Neuroimaging Laboratory at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, told The Huffington Post. "We know that the brain is driving cognition and behavior, so there must be some difference in the brain. This is the largest study to look at things like family income and the size of the brain."

Webmaster's Commentary: 

When kids go to school hungry, they can't learn. When they are chronically hungry, it affects brain development. And as reported at the Washingtonpost.com in October of last year:

The United States ranks near the bottom of the pack of wealthy nations on a measure of child poverty, according to a new report from UNICEF. Nearly one third of U.S. children live in households with an income below 60 percent of the national median income in 2008 - about $31,000 annually. In the richest nation in the world, one in three kids live in poverty. Let that sink in.

If indeed, "children are our future", this US government has collectively made the decision that the future of this country...is expendable.

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