YOU’RE NOW TWICE AS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE THE ‘AMERICAN DREAM’ IN CANADA | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


YOU’RE NOW TWICE AS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE THE ‘AMERICAN DREAM’ IN CANADA

The American dream — the idea that anyone can own their own home and do better than the previous generation with the right amount of hard work — has been fading for years, with rising house prices and stagnant wages. Now, people who want to achieve it may be better off seeking it in Canada, the U.K. or Denmark according to a new study published by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
At least the Fed is admitting its total failure.

The study, authored by Raj Chetty, professor of economics at Stanford University, defined the concept as the ability for children born in the bottom fifth of income distribution to reach the top fifth. In the U.S. the likelihood of that is 7.5%, whereas in Canada children born in that group are twice as likely to rise to the top — at 13.5%. In the U.K. the likelihood of achieving that move from the bottom fifth to the top fifth is 9% and in Denmark it is 11.7%.

Indeed, the rich do appear to be leaving the middle class behind. Most U.S. middle-income households (81%) had flat or falling income between 2004 and 2014, according to a U.S. Congressional Budget Office data analyzed by the McKinsey Global Institute, a global management company.

“Most people growing up in advanced economies since World War II have been able to assume they will be better off than their parents,” the report said. “Yet this overwhelmingly positive income trend has ended.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Congrats to the Fed for having stated the obvious!!

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