US Foreign Policy, Global Hegemony, “Soft Power” and the Geopolitics of Eurasia | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


US Foreign Policy, Global Hegemony, “Soft Power” and the Geopolitics of Eurasia

Henry Kissinger, one of the fundamental figures in creating and maintaining the US policy of global hegemonism during the Cold War[1], was quite clear and precise in his overviewing the issue of the American geopolitical position, national goals and foreign policy. His remarks can be summarized in the following points:
The US is an island off the shores of the large landmass of Eurasia.
The resources and population of Eurasia far exceed the resources and population of the US.
Any domination by any single state from Eurasia (either from the European or the Asian part) is a critical danger for the American geopolitical and geoeconomic aims as well as national interest regardless during or after the time of the Cold War.
A mortal danger for the US is formation of any political-military coalitions between the Euroasian great powers (primarily between the USSR/Russia and China) as such coalition would have a real capacity to outstrip both the US economy and military.
The US strategic global geopolitical interest is to thwart creation of such Eurasian coalition (the USSR/Russia-China).[2]
In fact, H. Kissinger recognized two fundamental facts in dealing with global geopolitics:
1) Eurasia is of crucial global geopolitical importance; and
2) Russia is a Heartland of Eurasia.[3] Therefore, to have a control over Russia means to have a control over Eurasia and to control Eurasia means to control the rest of the world. For that reason, the US struggle against the communist USSR during the Cold War or Putin’s Russia today is nothing else than a formal pretext for a realization of the basic US geopolitical task from the global perspective: to have a control over the Heartland of Eurasia. Subsequently, any kind of independent and/or stronger Russia is not acceptable solution for the American policymakers.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

But it looks as though the political/economic developments between members of BRIC and the SCO are changing this game, and quite concretely.

The economic reforms in China and Russia, coupled with their moving to embrace Europe, with trade and infrastructure, (like Xi Jinping's Silk Road project China pledges $124 billion for new Silk Road as champion of globalization) are leaving the USSA in the dust; this is why I am hearing so much demonisation of both countries, as though to prepare American citizens for wars against them, to stop the ascent of both the yuan, and the ruble.

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