The little red pill being pushed on the elderly | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


The little red pill being pushed on the elderly

The maker of a little red pill intended to treat a rare condition is raking in hundreds of millions of dollars a year as it aggressively targets frail and elderly nursing home residents for whom the drug may be unnecessary or even unsafe,?a CNN investigation has found.

And much of the money is coming straight from the federal government.
The pill, called Nuedexta, is approved to treat a disorder marked by sudden and uncontrollable laughing or crying -- known as pseudobulbar affect, or PBA. This condition afflicts less than 1% of all Americans, based on a calculation using the drugmaker's own figures, and it is most commonly associated with people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) or ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Nuedexta's financial success, however, is being propelled by a sales force focused on expanding the drug's use among elderly patients suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and high-volume prescribing and advocacy efforts by doctors receiving payments from the company, CNN found.

In her former nursing home, Lenore Greenfield was diagnosed with PBA and prescribed Nuedexta by California psychiatrist Romeo Isidro, a physician who has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in promotional payments from Avanir.

Since 2012, more than half of all Nuedexta pills have gone to long-term care facilities. The number of pills rose to roughly 14 million in 2016, a jump of nearly 400% in just four years, according to data obtained from QuintilesIMS, which tracks pharmaceutical sales. Total sales of Nuedexta reached almost $300 million that year.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

One of the many reasons why drug companies are so financially successful, is that doctors are compensated for prescribing "off book" prescriptions by the pharmaceutical houses manufacturing theer drugs.

I know this from experience, because it actually happened to me.

At 68, if an MD starts talking about an "off book" prescription for something I am dealing with, meaning it has not been tested for specific issues for which they want me to take a drug, I have zero problem asking them: "Are you being compensated by the manufacturer of this drug to prescribe it"?!?

It is a VERY reasonable question to ask your MD; if they balk and hem and haw, they probably are being compensated by the drug manufacturer.

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