Trump expected to demand China cut financial ties with North Korea | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Trump expected to demand China cut financial ties with North Korea

President Trump is expected to urge China to cut its financial links to Pyongyang and expel North Korean workers from the country during his two-day stop.

Trump arrived in Beijing on Wednesday after spending two days in South Korea, where he urged “responsible nations” to unite and stop supporting North Korea.

"You cannot support, you cannot supply, you cannot accept," he said, calling on "every nation, including China and Russia," to fully implement recent U.N. Security Council resolutions on North Korea.

Trump has praised President Xi Jinping for taking some steps against the hermit kingdom but urged him to do more, as White House officials believe the border between China and North Korea remains a trade corridor.

"I want to just say that President Xi -- where we will be tomorrow, China -- has been very helpful. We'll find out how helpful soon," Trump said Tuesday. "But he really has been very, very helpful. So China is out trying very hard to solve the problem with North Korea."

The White House is banking on Trump's personal relationship with Xi to drive the negotiations. Trump has frequently showered praise on Xi, who recently became the nation's most powerful leader in decades, including with a trip to Trump's Florida estate for a summit.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

China has been very clear that it is has done all that it can do regarding North Korea, particularly in light of the following statement by the Chinese government on how it has observed the UN Security Council Resolutions regarding this:

China Says it Fully Implements its Commitments on DPRK After Trump's Demand

IF China says they have done all they can do, President Trump is left with three choices regarding North Korea's nuclear program; a decap strike against Pyongyang, which will have the US and China at war with each other; find a way to depose Kim Jung Un from within; or simply view North Korea as an extant nuclear power, and deal with it on that level.