Saudi Crown prince Mohammed bin Salman welcomes Lebanese Patriarch | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Saudi Crown prince Mohammed bin Salman welcomes Lebanese Patriarch

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman met Lebanese Patriarch Bechara Boutros al Rahi, Tuesday, reported Saudi Press Agency.

Saudi king Salman bin Abdulaziz received earlier today the Lebanese Maronite Patriarch at Al-Yamamah Palace in Riyadh on Tuesday, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

The meeting tackled brotherly relations between the Saudi kingdom and Lebanon and confirmed the importance of different religions and cultures in strengthening tolerance, rejecting violence, extremism and terrorism and achieving peace and security for the region’s people and the world.

A number of Saudi ministers including Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir and Gulf Affairs Minister Thamer al-Sabhan attended the reception.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Great optics for the Prince; but I have to wonder why in the Sam Hill Lebanese Maronite Patriarch Al Rahi actually consented to meet with Prince Salman in the first place.

After all, Saudi Arabia is a country where the profession of Christianity is treated as a crime, potentially punishable by death.

The following article goes on to state:

"here are more than a million Roman Catholics in Saudi Arabia. Most of them are expatriate Filipinos who work there, but are not Saudi Arabian citizens.[1][6] The percentage of Christians of all denominations among the roughly 1.2 million Filipinos in Saudi Arabia likely exceeds 60%.[7] There are also Christians from Canada, the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Italy, Greece, South Korea, Ireland, the United Kingdom, India, China, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt and as well a number of Christians from sub-Saharan countries who are working in the Saudi Kingdom.[7]

Saudi Arabia allows Christians to enter the country as foreign workers for temporary work, but does not allow them to practice their faith openly.

Because of that Christians generally only worship within private homes.[7] Items and articles belonging to religions other than Islam are prohibited.[7] These include Bibles, crucifixes, statues, carvings, items with religious symbols, and others.[7]

The Saudi Arabian Mutaween (Arabic: مطوعين‎‎), or Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (i.e., the religious police) prohibits the practice of any religion other than Islam.[7] Conversion of a Muslim to another religion is considered apostasy,[7] a crime punishable by death if the accused does not recant. There have been no confirmed reports of executions for either crime in modern times.

[7] The Government does not permit non-Muslim clergy to enter the country for the purpose of conducting religious services.[7] In spite of this, a 2015 study estimates that there are some 60,000 Christians with a Muslim background living in the country, though that does not mean that all of those are citizens of the country.[8]

International Christian Concern (ICC) protested what it reported as the 2001 detention of 11 Christians in Saudi Arabia, for practicing their religion in their homes.[9] In June 2004, at least 46 Christians were arrested in what the ICC described as a "pogrom-like" action by Saudi police. The arrests took place shortly after the media reported that a Quran had been desecrated in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.[10]

Christians and other non-Muslims are prohibited from entering the cities of Mecca and Medina, Islam's holiest cities.[7]"

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