Doctor shared kid patients’ data with pharmaceutical company to push costly drug they didn’t need | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Doctor shared kid patients’ data with pharmaceutical company to push costly drug they didn’t need

A pediatric cardiologist from Marietta, Georgia, has admitted illegally providing confidential patient data to US pharmaceutical company Aegerion. The information was to help the company mismarket a costly drug.
Dr. Eduardo Montana, 55, pleaded guilty in a Boston court hearing to disclosing 280 patients’ “individually identifiable health information” to Aegerion. Last September, the company was fined over $35 million to resolve criminal charges linked to the mismarketing of its drug Juxtapid. Montana will be sentenced on June 4 and faces up to a year in prison, Reuters reports.

Aegerion conspired to surreptitiously gather patient data in order to determine their suitability for the product. Juxtapid, which received FDA approval in 2012, is only suitable for use for patients with a rare lipid disorder. However, both defendants willingly targeted patients that did not suffer from the condition.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA