Kilauea's continual eruption is creating a new fissure so big it could soon be classed as Hawaii's newest volcano | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Kilauea's continual eruption is creating a new fissure so big it could soon be classed as Hawaii's newest volcano

Kilauea, the most active volcano on Hawaii, has been in continual eruption since 1983.

It entered a new phase in early May when fractures along a rift on the eastern side of the volcano opened during a series of earthquakes – some of which became volcanic fissures from which lava was erupted.

These fissures allowed magma that had been ponded in a lava summit lake to drain onto the ground surface as lava flows lower down the mountain.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Maybe.

Volcanologists define a volcano as having its own distinct connection to the magma chamber. This new cone appears to be an offshoot of Kilauea's "drainage" system, and as such technically is not a new distinct volcano.

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