Kilauea’s heat triggering mass amounts of acid rain | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Kilauea’s heat triggering mass amounts of acid rain

Intense, hot air from the ongoing Kilauea eruption — combined with a drop in trade-winds — triggered 9.22 inches of rain containing sulfur dioxide to drench an isolated portion of the Lower East Rift Zone in the 24 hours that ended this morning at 8 a.m.

“The heat coming out of the lava is making the air mass really unstable,” said National Weather Service meteorologist John Bravender. “We’re not seeing it all the time, but it’s cropping up part of the time.”

The forecast of a return to more conventional tradewind patterns mean heavy rains over the Lower East Rift Zone are likely to dissipate as early as tonight, Bravender said.

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