Native Hawaiians see a silver lining to destruction caused by recent volcanic eruptions | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Native Hawaiians see a silver lining to destruction caused by recent volcanic eruptions

By many metrics, what is happening on Hawaii island can be considered a natural disaster. But native Hawaiians I spoke to view this period not as one of pure destruction, but rather the logical continuation of their islands’ geological evolution — a time of deep cultural and personal reflection and realignment.

“The word we use is ‘inevitable,’” cultural ambassador, community organizer and former Miss Hawaii Desiree Moana Cruz said in reference to how best to describe Kilauea’s latest lava flow. “Not tragedy, not disaster. I certainly feel compassion for the people who have lost their homes — they’re my friends, family and also strangers. But again, we all know this is where we live. We — and I mean native Hawaiians — say, ‘Have you seen the pele?’ Pele is the Hawaiian word for lava in all its manifestations, passed down through ancient chants and dances.”

“And speaking of Pele, she’s giving birth to land,” Cruz explained. She is referring to the deity Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire and volcanoes and the entity credited with the initial and continual creation of the Hawaiian islands. Many are saying Pele is angry, resulting in the sudden eruption, which is something Cruz takes umbrage with. “Just as in the human realm where incredible pain begets incredible beauty, this eruption is part of the process.”

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA