What’s Fact and What’s Fiction in Darkest Hour | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

What’s Fact and What’s Fiction in Darkest Hour

Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour is a piece of historical fiction that undertakes a serious historical task: to present Winston Churchill and the British people’s choice to stand up to Hitler as just that … a choice. In hindsight, after eventual victory, the decision to fight against the Germans can appear a foregone conclusion. Since we all like to imagine that we personally would never fold to the Nazis, it can be hard to understand that reasonable people, most of whom had no love for Hitler, seriously considered a truce in spring 1940, during the days depicted in the film. To their eyes, fighting on after the approaching fall of France would only delay the inevitable at the cost of mass civilian slaughter. Better to come to terms now while they still had the leverage of an army and aircraft factories.

However, the film does invent a few details in order to make this very dramatic time even more dramatic. As a British historian who teaches and writes about World War II, I break this all down below.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Claire and I watched this film last night, and it is an excellent film. Gary Oldman did a fantastic job. However, we did wonder if certain portions of the film were historically accurate, especially the subway train ride.

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