"SMART HOME" COMPANIES REFUSE TO SAY WHETHER LAW ENFORCEMENT IS USING YOUR GADGETS TO SPY ON YOU | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


"SMART HOME" COMPANIES REFUSE TO SAY WHETHER LAW ENFORCEMENT IS USING YOUR GADGETS TO SPY ON YOU

Transparency reports are standard practice across the tech industry, disclosing the nature, quantity and scope of all the law enforcement requests each company receives in a given year.

But there's a notable exception to this practice: the "smart home" companies who sell you products that fill your house with gadgets that know every intimate fact of your life -- all-seeing eyes, all-listening ears, all-surveillance network taps. The companies that sell these products refuse to say whether (or how) they are being suborned to serve as state surveillance adjuncts by law enforcement.

What the smaller but notable smart home players said August, a smart lock maker, said it “does not currently have a transparency report and we have never received any National Security Letters or orders for user content or non-content information under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA),” but did not comment on the number of subpoenas, warrants and court orders it receives. “August does comply with all laws and when faced with a court order or warrant, we always analyze the request before responding,” a spokesperson said.

Roomba maker iRobot said it “has not received any demands from governments for customer data,” but wouldn’t say if it planned to issue a transparency report in the future.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This is why I would NEVER allow a "smart home" object into our home, like Alexa, ever, unless it became legally mandated.

And should that become legally mandated, I would find a way of disabling the device so it was no longer listening to what I am saying, but appeared to be on, from the standpoint of who might be eavesdropping.

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