XI TELLS CHINA'S CRITICS TO "MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS" IN TRADE EXPO SPEECH; PLEDGES $30 TRILLION IN IMPORTS | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


XI TELLS CHINA'S CRITICS TO "MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS" IN TRADE EXPO SPEECH; PLEDGES $30 TRILLION IN IMPORTS

"Worry about your own damn self (Mr. Trump)."

That was the overriding message delivered by Chinese President Xi Jingping during his address at the International Import Expo Opening Ceremony in Shanghai on Monday, which featured more than 3,600 companies from 172 countries, regions and organizations, and where Xi urged critics of China's policies to worry about their own problems before opining on China's, according to the FT.

"Each country should work hard to improve its own business environment. One cannot always beautify oneself while criticising others, and one can’t shine a flashlight on other people without looking at oneself," said Mr Xi.

That said, Xi stopped short of naming Trump or the U.S. in the speech, his most high-profile economic address since April. Instead, and without a trace of irony, he stepped up warnings that protectionism would harm global growth while pledging to boost domestic consumption, strengthen intellectual property protection and advance trade talks with Europe, Japan and South Korea.

If there was a dominant theme from the expo - which is being held as China's trade surplus with the US has continued to expand in spite of US tariffs on roughly half of Chinese goods crossing its borders - it was China's attempts to position itself as the leader of a bloc of emerging-market nations, as the US and many of its allies declined to send government delegations (though, to be sure, representatives of many of the largest US corporations did attend). All told, 18 heads of state were expected to attend the summit. The Chinese government declared Monday and Tuesday holidays in Shanghai to ameliorate traffic for the event, which Xi has said will be held annually from here on out.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

President Xi seems to be drawing his line in the sand, against the US's actions, including punishing tariffs against Chinese goods.

The problem, however, is that everyone in this country who needs to buy goods from China, is also getting punished by these tariffs.

And the question I hope President Trump and his advisors are asking, is what would China really want to buy from the US?!? It's certainly not our chemical-laden agriculture; it won't be our weapons, as China has, in many instances, surprised and surpassed the US recently, with its drive toward superior weaponry.

I would suggest that President Trump think about focusing in advances in licensed, high-tech research, with generous start-up money, in public/private partnerships. This could make the US the envy of the world, with numerous tech "incubators", and might be a solid avenue of exploration for trade with China.

And in my world, trade trumps war any day.

I am hoping that in a meeting in the sidelines with President Trump, at the G 20 in Buenos Aires, Argentina at the end of this month, that Trump will have something to offer Xi other than more tariffs; if not, I will very concerned about how the possibility of a trade war morphing into an actual shooting war,and quickly, if these issues remain unresolved.

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