RUSSIA DEPLOYS ITS AVANGARD HYPERSONIC GLIDE VEHICLE | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


RUSSIA DEPLOYS ITS AVANGARD HYPERSONIC GLIDE VEHICLE

On Oct. 12 CNBC reported that Russia had hit a snag in its development of its hypersonic weapon, because it was at the time unable to find a source for the critical carbon fiber components. The news agency stated that the Pentagon had doubts that the Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) existed. Skepticism seems widespread. Some believe that Russia’s new super weapons are “virtual reality,” while others think they are “mostly hype.” In March, the National Interest cited Michael Kofman, a research scientist for the Center for Naval Analyses and a highly respected analyst, who offered his assurances that there was no chance Russia could field its hypervelocity boost-glide weapon by 2019. But history has shown that those who believed it to be just a bluff have been proven wrong.

According to recent Russian media reports, the Avangard hypersonic boost-glide system, one of the new super weapons that President Putin mentioned in his address to the Federal Assembly in March, went into production last summer and will be operational with the 13th Strategic Missile Forces division by the end of 2019. It will be deployed near Yasny, a town 502 kilometers (312 mi) southeast of Orenburg in the southern Urals, by the end of 2019.

Normally it takes two systems for a regiment to be combat ready by that time, but in this case that number will be increased to six. At least two regiments with six systems each are expected to be battle-ready by 2027. According to the state armaments program (GPV2027), twelve UR-100UTTKh (NATO: SS-19 Stiletto) missiles will be integrated into the Avangard hypersonic glide vehicles (HGVs). The deployment of the HGV might begin without additional flight tests. Eventually, the Sarmat RS-28 ICBM could be used to deliver the Avangard, potentially carrying a single, massive thermonuclear warhead with a yield exceeding two megatons.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The problem is not that the Russians have this capability; the question is, why does the US military complex not have it, in fact, in several phases ahead of the Russians?!?

The reasons here are very complex.

First, there is a very much "too cosy" relationship between weapons manufacturers, who support political campaigns, and the politicians who have the power to sign off on huge weapons contracts.

Therefore, US weapons manufacturers believe they are free to offer weapons systems which are "glitchy" and do not perform as advertised; that they can deliver weapons systems so late as to be obsolete; and can have cost over-runs on everything which make the cost double, treble, or quadruple the original estimates.

This has to stop and immediately.

No contractor should have the right to "buy" those members of Congress who award weapons contracts, which allow the foregoing to happen.

Contracts for weapons systems must be based on merit, period, end of discussion.

And in the wording of said contracts, there needs to have a clause inserted that if the projects do not work as advertised (like Lockheed Martin's F-35), are delivered so late as to be obsolete; or run up massive cost over-runs, the executives of those companies will be tried for treason for failing to deliver as promised by a jury of their peers, and do hard jail time.

As absolutely draconian as this may sound, it may put an end to endangering our troops' lives with inferior weapons products.

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