US Wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan Killed 500,000 People | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


US Wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan Killed 500,000 People

Brown University has released a new study on the cost in lives of America’s Post-9/11 Wars, in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. The study estimates between 480,000 and 507,000 people were killed in the course of the three conflicts.

This includes combatant deaths and civilian deaths in fighting and war violence. Civilians make up over half of the roughly 500,000 killed, with both opposition fighters and US-backed foreign military forces each sustaining in excess of 100,000 deaths as well.

This is admittedly a dramatic under-report of people killed in the wars, as it only attempts to calculate those killed directly in war violence, and not the massive number of others civilians who died from infrastructure damage or other indirect results of the wars. The list also excludes the US war in Syria, which itself stakes claims to another 500,000 killed since 2011.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This study reminds me that, as Karl Marx so succinctly stated, all wars are economic in origin.

In Afghanistan, you have the pipelines; the rare earth minerals, and the poppy crops; in Iraq, you have the pipelines; and in Pakistan, you have an embarrassment of resources: Natural Resources of Pakistan

The US government's MO, in more recent years, post 9/11, has been to destabilize, regime change, insuring that they are installing a US-centric government, then selling that countries only through "approved corporations, and only in US dollars.

But that even one person dies, let alone numbers like these, are appallingly immoral, and as though the US government, collectively, will be able to continue these practices with complete impunity.

Unfortunately, however, as history has taught us, the US government may find itself on a "bridge too far" from one of these future military misadventures, and unable to extricate itself from the potentially very brutal results of these wars.

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