US bombs continue to kill in Laos 50 years after Vietnam War | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


US bombs continue to kill in Laos 50 years after Vietnam War

US dropped two million tonnes of bombs on Laos at height of Vietnam War. Why are cluster munitions still killing?

Vientiane - This year's Thanksgiving celebration marks 50 years since the American military embarked on the biggest bombing campaign in history, decimating the small Southeast Asian country of Laos by dropping more than two million tonnes of bombs on it at the height of the Vietnam War.

Half a century on, innocent lives are still being lost as the country struggles with the leftovers of the conflict.

On Thanksgiving Day in November 1968, the United States escalated its war against North Vietnam in Laos.

Then-US President Lyndon B Johnson had ordered traditional turkey dinners to be helicoptered in to US troops who were secretly deployed in the quiet, landlocked country to sever the North Vietnamese supply lines that ran through the east.

At the same time, the US began dropping millions of tonnes of bombs - they "fell like rain" on the supply lines in Laos, a network of paths and tracks known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail, and most of the east of the country.

That hugely redoubled effort to shut down the trail saw a planeload of bombs dropped on Laos every eight minutes, 24 hours a day, for nine years.

Now, some 80 million unexploded bombs and air-dropped cluster munitions left over continue to maim and kill Laotian men, women and children.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The US government and military rarely clean up their global messes; it should be American teams in Laos, doing the cleanup, and making living for these people safe again, without the threat of even one child ever getting torn apart, limb from limb, by these devices.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA