Pharma company 'KNEW vaginal mesh implant would leave women in pain': Emails reveal executives were warned it could twist patients' nerves before it hit the market, report claims | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Pharma company 'KNEW vaginal mesh implant would leave women in pain': Emails reveal executives were warned it could twist patients' nerves before it hit the market, report claims

Johnson & Johnson sold a faulty vaginal mesh implant that left tens of thousands of women in agony despite knowing the risks before it hit the market, a new report claims.

Internal emails seen by the Guardian show executives at the pharmaceutical company had been briefed on the product's flaws - namely that it could turn extremely rigid, inflict serious pain, and could be near impossible to remove.

In May 2004, before the product was launched, a member of staff warned others that the mesh could turn 'hard as a rock' and could bend like a 'folded potato chip' after implantation, while another said its capacity to shrink 'may lead to pain'.

And yet, months later, the device was launched and promoted, and over the next seven years tens of thousands of women unwittingly followed their doctors' advice to undergo the operation which would change their lives.

Now, Johnson & Johnson's internal dealings are coming to light amid a series of lawsuits, the latest of which comes from Suzanne Emmett, 60, from Pennsylvania, who says she now suffers incontinence, chronic pain, and sexual dysfunction.

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